Violence and power in early renaissance florence

 

Dr Scott Nethersole

Thursday 4 – Saturday 6 September 2014

£400

Fifteenth-century Florence witnessed a delicate balance of power, an equilibrium so fragile that it frequently tipped over causing widespread violence, social unrest, exile and political instability. Yet despite such a tumultuous history, the visual arts produced by the likes of Masaccio, Filippo Lippi or Botticelli in this period are often seen in a very different light: a world of sweet Madonnas, ideal bodies and enlightened humanist patrons. Breaking with such traditions, this study trip will examine how visual media were exploited to serve the interests of different parties against the backdrop of these vicissitudes. On each day of this to tour to Florence, we will follow a well-known route that not only cuts across the urban geography of the city, but also across our preconceptions of the Renaissance. They will include the route followed by the condemned on their way to the scaffold, that taken by a new Archbishop upon appointment, and that followed by the Magi processions on 6 January. En route we will visit some of Florence’s most famous sites and works of art and view them with new eyes.


renaissance bruges: public splendour, private devotion and civic pride

NEW TOUR  

Dr Susan Jones

Friday 12 – Sunday 14 September 2014

£400

 

Our destination is the picturesque Flemish town of Bruges, a formidable centre of trade and culture in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.  Following in the footsteps of countless artists, historians and art historians, we will examine objects of exquisite refinement and beauty in their place of origin. Over three days, we will see sites, monuments and objects that shed light on Bruges society in the Renaissance and on the often complex relationships between civic, courtly, ecclesiastical and private life. We will study the refined and detailed oil paintings of Netherlandish painters such as Jan van Eyck and Hans Memling, but we will also delve into  the media of sculpture, manuscript illumination, bronze casting, tapestry and goldsmith work.  Perhaps the most valuable sights, however, will be the buildings and façades, canals and squares of Bruges itself, which, despite the passage of time, provide valuable evidence for life in Bruges in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries.




baroque rome: the "great theatre of the world"

NEW TOUR  

Dr Miriam Di Penta
Thursday 9 October - Sunday 12 October  2014
£500

In the seventeenth century, Rome became the most dynamic centre of artistic production in Italy, overtaking both Florence and Venice. The Catholic Church employed the visual arts as instruments of propaganda, and in the process transformed Rome into a modern city and a vibrant theatre for its message of triumph and glory.  Behind these developments were different Popes, but also various religious orders and sophisticated private patrons.  Countless Italian artists and foreigners from Flanders, Holland and France converged on Rome and brought their own cultures into this lively artistic melting pot. Starting with the works of Annibale Carracci and Caravaggio, the two great innovators of Roman Baroque Painting, we will proceed to look at the grandiose buildings of Bernini and Borromini, whose projects so dramatically contributed to the changing image of the city.

Visits will include the Carracci Gallery at Palazzo Farnese; a number of important churches, including S. Luigi dei Francesi, Sant’ Agostino, Santa Maria del Popolo, Sant’Andrea della Valle, Santa Maria in Vallicella, and il Gesù; and significant historical collections such as those at  Galleria Borghese, Galleria Doria-Pamphilj and Galleria Corsini, all offering a rich array of relevant paintings and sculptures.

 

LECTURERS' BIOGRAPHIES

 

Dr Scott Nethersole took his doctorate at The Courtauld on ‘The Representation of Violence in Fifteenth-century Florence’.  While writing his PhD he held the Michael Bromberg Fellowship in the Department of Prints and Drawings in the British Museum.  Subsequently he was the Harry M Weinrebe Curatorial Assistant at the National Gallery, London, before returning to The Courtauld in 2010 to take up the post of Lecturer in Italian Renaissance Art. He curated the exhibition Devotion by Design: Italian Altarpieces before 1500 at the National Gallery in 2011 and is currently finishing a book on Violent Art in Early Renaissance Florence.

Dr Susan Jones wrote her PhD at The Courtauld on Jan van Eyck. From 1994 to 1996, she was Assistant Curator at The National Gallery, London, and from 1998–2001 Old Master Society Fellow in the Department of European Painting at The Art Institute of Chicago. She has published widely on Jan van Eyck and is a co-author of Northern European and Spanish Paintings before 1600 in the Art Institute of Chicago: A Catalogue of the Collection (Yale University Press, 2008). Currently, she is a Visiting Lecturer at The Courtauld and is writing a book on Jan van Eyck.

Dr Miriam Di Penta studied for a postgraduate diploma at The Courtauld and obtained her PhD in art history at the University of Rome. Her research focuses on the Italian Baroque and Italian art collecting during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.  She has taught at the University of Rome and published numerous articles as well as a book, Cardinal Giovan Battista Spinola and Baciccio (2007). As a specialist consultant in the Old Master Paintings Department at Sotheby’s, she honed her understanding of art works as physical objects. She is currently writing a book on the Neapolitan artist Andrea de Leone.

Public Programmes

Study Tours Archive: 2013


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great landscapes of the cotswolds

NEW TOUR

Dr Paula Henderson

Friday 7 – Sunday 9 June 2013

£425

Some of the greatest historic landscapes survive in the Cotswold hills, including those of Blenheim Palace, whose park retains remnants of ‘Rosamund’s Bower’, the pleasure garden associated with medieval Woodstock Palace, traces of the early eighteenth-century militaristic gardens laid out for the first Duke of Marlborough and, most notably, the finest landscape scene ‘Capability’ Brown ever created. In addition to unravelling Blenheim’s history, we will visit Rousham Park, William Kent’s lyrical evocation of a classical landscape. There are also survivals of formal gardens, including the late seventeenth-century Anglo-Dutch water garden at Westbury Court and the delightful Arts and Crafts garden at Rodmarton Manor, still cared for by the original family. We will have private access to the late Rosemary Verey’s influential garden at Barnsley House and will investigate the remarkable archaeological evidence for the gardens of Chipping Campden Manor, a house built in 1615 and demolished in the Civil War, where the ghosts of terraces and water gardens appear in the dramatic earthworks. Travel will be by coach and we will meet in the ancient market town of Chipping Campden, which has hotels in all price ranges. The course will begin at noon on Friday and conclude mid-afternoon on Sunday.



Edvard munch's oslo

NEW TOUR

Dr Elena Kashina

Friday 28 – Sunday 30 June 2013

£400

CANCELLATION: We regret that this Study Tour had to be cancelled.


Akseli Gallen-Kallela, Portrait of Munch, 1895, Ateneum taidemuseo, HelsinkiOslo, where Munch began and concluded his career, and in whose locations and fjord he found artistic inspiration, is incomparably rich in works by this great modern artist. Thousands of paintings and graphic works document every stage of his artistic development. 2013, the Munch Year in Norway, presents an unmissable opportunity to benefit from this wealth and from many new initiatives dedicated to the artist. This Study Tour will take us to the principal collections of Munch’s work, specifically the Munch Museum, but also to the bridge on a picturesque hill overlooking Oslo city harbour, where his ‘endless scream’ still resonates, to the studio where he worked during the last three decades of his life, and to the enchanting nearby coastal town of Åsgårdstrand, whose inhabitants and views became Munch’s most affectionately rendered scenes. We will visit the small town of Hvitsen, where the artist’s house and studio will be opened to the public for the first time, and where a new gallery will be dedicated to his work. The Study Tour will conclude with a visit to the Museum and extensive Sculpture Park celebrating the work of Gustav Vigeland, Munch’s contemporary, sometime rival and fellow contributor to international modernism.



dreaming spires and pre-raphaelite scholars: victorian oxford

Dr Carol Jacobi

Saturday 7 – Sunday 8 September 2013

£250

From William Holman Hunt's The Light of the World in Keble College to the tapestries of William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones in Exeter College, Oxford is rich in Victorian history and art. The Ashmolean Museum and its Pre-Raphaelite paintings and drawings can be explored alongside Deane and Woodward's very different Natural History Museum. All were influenced by John Ruskin, who also pioneered international arts and crafts. The Oxford Union's Arthurian murals by Morris, Rossetti, Faulkner and Burne-Jones represented an important beginning for what would become Morris & Company. Walter Pater, who coined the phrase 'art for art's sake' was a favourite tutor of Oscar Wilde. Magdalen, Wilde's college, employed the architects G. F. Bodley and Thomas Garner to design the sophisticated St. Swithun's Quadrangle. Its complexity is comparable to T. G. Jackson's Examination Schools in a Jacobean style, and Bodley and Garner's Gothic Revival work for Christ Church College and its cathedral, which also features Morris & Co. stained glass. The city of 'dreaming spires' affords an extraordinary opportunity to experience the experimental beauty and innovation of these Victorians, and explore how their art and their architecture arose from the concerns of their times.

byzantine Thessaloniki: the 'co-queen' of byzantium

Dr Cecily Hennessy

Wednesday 18 - Saturday 21 September 2013

£525

Vibrant, culturally rich Thessaloniki is an ideal site for art historical exploration. It is steeped in a fascinating history and has several World Heritage sites. This trip focuses on material from the fourth to the fifteenth centuries, when Thessaloniki was the principal Byzantine centre of northern Greece, a city second only to Constantinople. It has unparalleled early mosaics as well as exquisite decorations from later Byzantium and excellent new museums. Early buildings include the striking fifth-century rotunda dedicated to Agios Georgios, with its idealised youthful saints depicted in the dome; the tiny church of Osios David with its unique representation of Christ; and the church of the city’s patron saint, the beloved Demetrios, with its remarkable pre-iconoclastic mosaics. Equally notable are churches decorated in later times, including Agia Sophia, the Panagia Chalkeon and Saint Nicolaos Orphanos. Among other sites, we also visit the acclaimed Museum of Byzantine Culture and the Roman palace.

violence and power in early renaissance florence

NEW TOUR

Dr Scott Nethersole

Friday 27 – Sunday 29 September 2013

£400


Fifteenth-century Florence witnessed a delicate balance of power, an equilibrium so fragile that it frequently tipped over causing widespread violence, social unrest, exile and political instability. Yet despite such a tumultuous history, the visual arts produced by the likes of Masaccio, Filippo Lippi or Botticelli in this period are often seen in a very different light: a world of sweet Madonnas, ideal bodies and enlightened humanist patrons. Breaking with such traditions, this study trip will examine how visual media were exploited to serve the interests of different parties against the backdrop of these vicissitudes. On each day of this tour to Florence, we will follow a well-known route that not only cuts across the urban geography of the city, but also across our preconceptions of the Renaissance. They will include the route followed by the condemned on their way to the scaffold, that taken by a new Archbishop upon appointment, and that followed by the Magi processions on 6 January. En route we will visit some of Florence’s most famous sites and works of art and view them with new eyes.


santiago de compostela

NEW TOUR

Dr Rose Walker and Professor Rocío Sánchez Ameijeiras

Friday 11 – Sunday 13 October 2013

£400

The culmination of so many pilgrimage journeys, Santiago de Compostela has crafted its fine cathedral to give a true sense of arrival. A small city at the end of the known world in the Middle Ages, it knew how to receive travellers. This tour will look at the city through the description in the twelfth-century Pilgrim’s Guide from the Codex Calixtinus and visit the surviving landmarks. To the horror of pilgrims and art historians alike the manuscript was stolen in 2011, but fortunately recovered this year. Above all, we will consider the cathedral and its architectural conundrums from the earliest Romanesque chapels at the east end to its magnificent Gothic west entrance. We will discuss the conservation of the Pórtico de la Gloria from the scaffolding with Rocío Sánchez Ameijeiras, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela and member of the Comité Científico that is supervising it. There will be a visit to the Museum with its curator to help us understand the fine sculpture now on the south door of the cathedral, the Puerta de las Platerías. For refreshment we will go to the sixteenth-century Hostal de los Reyes Católicos, now the city’s Parador, and have lunch at a Galician restaurant.



Rome: Politics, Power and Religion from the birth of christianity until 1300

Dr Eileen Rubery

Wednesday 23 – Friday 25 October 2013

£400

This three-day study tour will explore important sites in Rome from the period of St Peter’s arrival in the city to the removal of the papacy to France at the beginning of the fourteenth century. We will discuss the 'Christianisation' of Rome and the Roman Empire following Constantine the Great's accession as Emperor and explore how art in Rome later came to reflect struggles with the Byzantine Empire over doctrinal questions, including the debate over the balance between Christ's humanity and divinity. What effect did the Papacy's defense of iconoclasm have on Roman art? What did art in Carolingian Rome look like? Visits aim to include the church of S Maria Antiqua, (a complete church from the sixth- ninth centuries, full of frescoes with many Eastern features, including the only Western example of tetramorph angels) which is not normally open to the public; the catacombs of Saint Priscilla (which include many of the earliest Christian images from the third and fourth centuries) and the Pope's Sancta Sanctorum, the lavishly decorated private chapel of the Popes in the Lateran complex; also with restricted access.


the bay of naples

NEW TOUR

James McDonaugh

Monday 11 – Friday 15 November 2013

£650


Naples has long held a particular appeal for visitors. The phrase ‘See Naples and Die’ was allegedly coined by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe during the Golden Age of the Grand Tour, but already in Roman times, the city and its environs were a major visitor destination. Today, Naples is perhaps Italy’s most misunderstood city, a by-word for chaos yet filled with spectacular art and architecture that the majority of tourists miss. We will explore the hidden corners of the city and discover early Christian mosaics, medieval tombs, Renaissance sculpture and paintings by Caravaggio. The Bay of Naples is dotted with breathtaking classical sites, many of which are missed by visitors flocking to Pompeii alone. We will explore Cumae, the first Greek settlement on the Italian mainland, the ‘Burning Fields’ to the west of Naples, the great villa at Oplontis, and the ‘Villa Pausylipon’, that extraordinary example of Roman engineering. We will also take a day trip to the Greek Doric temples at Paestum. Neapolitan food is among the finest in Italy and we will be sampling the best of this as we go along. This trip is designed to show you some of the great hidden sights of southern Italy.

great landscapes of the cotswolds

NEW TOUR

Dr Paula Henderson

Friday 7 – Sunday 9 June 2013

£425

Some of the greatest historic landscapes survive in the Cotswold hills, including those of Blenheim Palace, whose park retains remnants of ‘Rosamund’s Bower’, the pleasure garden associated with medieval Woodstock Palace, traces of the early eighteenth-century militaristic gardens laid out for the first Duke of Marlborough and, most notably, the finest landscape scene ‘Capability’ Brown ever created. In addition to unravelling Blenheim’s history, we will visit Rousham Park, William Kent’s lyrical evocation of a classical landscape. There are also survivals of formal gardens, including the late seventeenth-century Anglo-Dutch water garden at Westbury Court and the delightful Arts and Crafts garden at Rodmarton Manor, still cared for by the original family. We will have private access to the late Rosemary Verey’s influential garden at Barnsley House and will investigate the remarkable archaeological evidence for the gardens of Chipping Campden Manor, a house built in 1615 and demolished in the Civil War, where the ghosts of terraces and water gardens appear in the dramatic earthworks. Travel will be by coach and we will meet in the ancient market town of Chipping Campden, which has hotels in all price ranges. The course will begin at noon on Friday and conclude mid-afternoon on Sunday.


Public Programmes

Study Tours Archive: 2012



Byzantine Istanbul

Dr Cecily Hennessy

Wednesday 28 March - Saturday 31 March 2012

£525

 

The great city of Constantinople lay at the heart of Byzantium and was to surpass Rome in its wealth and reputation. We examine the political and religious sites that remain in Istanbul, one of the most beautifully situated cities and itself a vibrant and fascinating centre. Visits include secular architecture, such as the massive city walls and a huge underground cistern, several former churches, including the legendary 6th -century church of Hagia Sophia and the Kariye Camii with its brilliant mosaics, as well as the vestiges of the renowned imperial palace and the fine archaeological museum. We also visit less well-known sites, such as the Fetiye Camii with its exquisite late Byzantine decorations, and examine the influence of Byzantium on the great Ottoman architect of the 16th century, Sinan.

This course may be taken in conjunction with the trip to Cappadocia or separate from it.

 

With optional link to

Byzantine Cappadocia

Dr Cecily Hennessy

Sunday 1 April – Wednesday 4 April 2012

£525

In the heart of central Turkey, the region of Cappadocia has an astonishing landscape with stunning rock creations which contain a wealth of rock cut churches and monasteries from the Byzantine period. Many of these were painted with expressive and beautifully coloured paintings. Significant in preserving iconography and painting styles from the early years of Byzantium perhaps even from before Iconoclasm, the region also has key paintings from the 10th to 12th centuries. We will be based in Göreme, which itself has a group of important churches and take day excursions to valleys in the area to see some of the lesser known sites. There will be some walking, which may be steep and rugged.

This course may be taken in conjunction with the trip to Istanbul or separate from it.

The Art of Perugia and the Valle Umbra during the Fifteenth Century

NEW TOUR

Dr Scott Nethersole

Friday 1 – Sunday 3 June 2012

£425

 

Despite its exceptional quality and beauty, most of the quattrocento art of the valle Umbra is generally only considered in relation to the occasional excursion of a Florentine or Sienese artist: the ‘Renaissance’ is seen to have been brought to the region by a foreigner and taken up by his provincial followers. This situation changes with the arrival on the scene of Perugino, native to the area, but trained in Florence. We will adopt a different approach. Based in Perugia, we will closely examine painting, sculpture and the decorative arts of this central region and place the art of Perugino into context, by considering those generations of painters who preceded him, among them Benedetto Bonfigli, Bartolomeo Caporali, or Fiorenzo di Lorenzo. We will contemplate the works of artists from outside Perugia, such as Gentile da Fabriano, Fra Angelico or Agostino di Duccio, but we will do so by asking what actual relationship existed between the apparent centre and so-called periphery. We will visit the Galleria Nazionale dell’Umbria and the many churches and secular buildings scattered around the city. We also intend to travel out across the valle Umbra to see the Palazzo Trinci at Foligno and San Francesco at Montefalco.

Norwegian Sensibilities: the Oslo of Ibsen, Munch and Vigeland

NEW TOUR

Dr Elena Kashina

Friday 15 – Sunday 17 June 2012

£400

The trip to Oslo will focus on the period from the 1870s to the 1950s. The last decades of the nineteenth century saw Norway actively sharing in the pan-European elation of re-discovering and re-defining national identities. In Norway, this was underscored by an intensifying drive towards national independence, after centuries of being ruled by Denmark (1536 – 1814) and then by Sweden (1814 – 1905). During our visits we will explore a distinctly indigenous tradition, expressed in paintings, sculpture and architecture, and in a language which represents a meeting of the broader European cultural expression and of Norway’s very own sensibilities. We shall start by visiting the National Gallery, and proceed to the Museum of Decorative Arts.

The Munch Museum will offer an insight into a Norwegian interpretation of early twentieth- century aesthetics. Sculptural work by Gustav Vigeland, set in Oslo’s largest landscaped park, presents a reflection on the human condition, arguably informed by the historically forlorn nature of Norwegian lifestyle and by post-war reconstruction. Finally, the Oslo City Hall is a monument to Norway’s cultural and civic achievement. Raised on the site of a notorious slum area, it has a unique character symbolic of a unity of national romanticism and functionality.

Dreaming Spires and Pre-Raphaelite Scholars: Victorian Oxford

Dr Ayla Lepine

Saturday 15 – Sunday 16 September 2012

UK TOUR

£250

Please note that due to circumstances beyond her control, Dr Lepine will be unable to accompany this tour. It will now be led by Dr Carol Jacobi, an acknowledged authority on the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and Victorian visual culture more widely

From William Holman-Hunt’s The Light of the World in Keble College to the tapestries of William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones in Exeter College, Oxford is rich in Victorian history and objects. The Oxford Union’s Arthurian murals by Morris, Rossetti, Faulkner and Burne-Jones represented an important beginning for what would become Morris & Company. The Ashmolean Museum and its Pre-Raphaelite art collection can be explored alongside Deane and Woodward’s Natural History Museum. The latter was strongly influenced by John Ruskin, who lectured at the university and gave his name to the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art. Walter Pater, who coined the phrase ‘art for art’s sake’ and wrote The Renaissance, was a favourite tutor of Oscar Wilde. Magdalene, Wilde’s college, employed the architects G. F. Bodley and Thomas Garner to design St. Swithun’s Quadrangle, one of the most sophisticated Victorian buildings in Oxford. Its complexity is comparable to T. G. Jackson’s Examination Schools in a Jacobean style, and Bodley and Garner’s Gothic Revival work for Christ Church College and its cathedral, which also features Morris & Co. stained glass. The city of ‘dreaming spires’ affords an extraordinary opportunity to experience the beauty and innovation of Victorian art and architecture.

Historic Gardens of the Cotswolds

Dr Paula Henderson

Friday 21 – Sunday 23 September 2012

£400

 

The Cotswold hills, with their mellow stone cottages, elegant manor houses, and imposing castles, have some of the most important historic gardens in England. This study trip will concentrate on gardens from the late 17th century to the early 20th century, beginning with a visit to Badminton House (home of the Duke and Duchess of Beaufort), which is rarely open to the public. On Saturday, we will start at Croome Park, ‘Capability’ Brown’s first complete commission and the one on which he continued working throughout his life. In the afternoon we will visit two of the quirkiest English landscape gardens: Painswick Rococo Garden and Sezincote, a ‘Hindoo’ garden, partially attributed to Humphry Repton. Finally, on Sunday, we will concentrate on 20th -century gardens: Snowshill, an early Arts and Crafts garden; Hidcote, described by Vita Sackville-West as a ‘flawless example of what a garden should be’; and Kiftsgate, a dramatically sited garden created and maintained by three generations of the same family. Because of the distances involved, we will travel together by coach. The meeting point will be in Stow-on-the-Wold, which has hotels and B&Bs in all price ranges. 




Under the Sun: Modern Artists on the French Riviera

NEW TOUR

Dr Caroline Levitt

Friday 12 – Sunday 14 October 2012

£400

This tour is now FULL. Please contact us if you would like to be added to a waiting list.

The French Riviera was a particularly fertile region for artists at the start of the twentieth century. Much-loved figures from Matisse to Chagall lived in and around Nice, and the Côte d’Azur bears testament to their productive creativity. On this three-day study tour, we will think specifically about the ways in which artists like Chagall, Cocteau, Léger, Matisse and Picasso found particular freedom for their artistic practice in this region, and will focus on the development of their ideas and techniques beyond painting and sculpture to incorporate mosaics, stained glass, ceramics and frescos. An intriguing side-theme will emerge: that of artists involved in designing and decorating chapels in the years following the Second World War. Visits will include: the museums dedicated to Matisse and Chagall in Nice, to Léger in Biot and to Picasso in Antibes; chapels decorated by Matisse, Picasso and Cocteau in Vence, Vallauris and Villefranche-sur-mer; and the remarkable Fondation Maeght in Saint-Paul-de-Vence. We will be based in Nice and travel by public transport.

 

Hidden Sicily: The North West

NEW TOUR

James McDonaugh

Monday 15 – Friday 19 October 2012

£650

This tour is now FULL. Please contact us if you would like to be added to a waiting list.

This tour focuses on north western Sicily and a number of sights well off the beaten tourist track. We will spend 3 nights in the beautiful and dramatically situated medieval hill town of Erice and one night in Agrigento. Our span of history will be wide, taking in works of art and architecture from the island’s Phoenician, Norman and Baroque eras. The ancient Greeks will be a particular focus for us as we visit the two greatest ancient ruins on the island: Selinunte and Agrigento. We will also give special consideration to Arab rule in Sicily when we visit Trapani and Marsala. One afternoon will be given to a fabulous walk through Sicily’s most beautiful nature reserve, the Riserva dello Zingaro. We will visit an olive oil estate where we will have a private lunch. The tour will be of equal interest to those who know the island well and wish to explore its hidden gems and to the first-time visitor.

 

Rome: Politics, Power and Religion from the Birth of Christianity until 1300

Dr Eileen Rubery

Wednesday 24 – Friday 26 October 2012

£400

This tour is now FULL. Please contact us if you would like to be added to a waiting list.

 

This three-day study tour will explore important sites in Rome from the period of St Peter and Saint Paul’s arrival in the city to the removal of the papacy to France at the beginning of the 14th century. We will discuss the ‘Christianisation’ of Rome following Constantine the Great’s arrival and explore how art in Rome reflected struggles with the Eastern Empire over the nature of the balance between Christ’s humanity and divinity. What effect did the Papacy’s defence of iconoclasm have on Roman art? What did art in Carolingian Rome look like? Visits aim to include the church of S Maria Antiqua, (a complete church from the 6th- 9th centuries, full of frescoes with many Eastern features, including the only Western example of tetramorph angels) which is not normally open to the public; the catacombs of Saint Priscilla (which include many of the earliest Christian images from the 3rd and 4th centuries) and the Pope’s sancta sanctorum, the lavishly decorated private chapel of the Popes in the Lateran complex; also with restricted access.

 

Public Programmes

Study Tours Archive: 2011



FORGED BY MANY CULTURES, PART II: EASTERN SICILY

NEW TOUR

James McDonaugh

Sunday 1 – Wednesday 4 May 2011

£500

The tour continues our exploration of Sicily’s fascinating (art) history and of the layers of civilisations that shaped it.  This year, we will head to the Eastern shores of the island to experience the treasures of Syracuse, of Piazza Armerina and of Sicily’s finest baroque cities.  Syracuse is one of the jewels in Sicily's crown and Ortygia (where we will be staying) remains one of the most unspoilt historical city centres in Italy. Its Duomo is in itself a carved history of western architecture and its archaeological remains are among Sicily's most magnificent.  One of the highlights of our tour will be the Roman mosaics at Piazza Armerina. These are unique in scale and were one of the wonders of the Roman world.   Sicily is, of course, also famed for its exuberant baroque art and architecture.  The towns of Noto, Ragusa and Modica – off the beaten tourist track and now protected by UNESCO - contain the island’s richest concentration of baroque architecture.   We will reach Eastern Sicily via Catania, the island’s second largest city, which also has stunning baroque palaces and churches. Last but not least we will also visit the dramatically situated town of Enna, Italy's highest provincial capital.


DREAMING SPIRES AND PRE-RAPHAELITE SCHOLARS: VICTORIAN OXFORD

NEW TOUR

Ayla Lepine

Saturday 11 – Sunday 12 June 2011

£200 

From William Holman-Hunt’s The Light of the World in Keble College to the tapestries of William Morris and Edward Burne-Jones in Exeter College, Oxford is rich in Victorian history and objects. The Oxford Union’s Arthurian murals by Morris, Rossetti, Faulkner and Burne-Jones represented an important beginning for what would become Morris & Company. The Ashmolean Museum and its Pre-Raphaelite art collection can be explored alongside Deane and Woodward’s Natural History Museum. The latter was strongly influenced by John Ruskin, who lectured at the university and gave his name to the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art. Walter Pater, who coined the phrase ‘art for art’s sake’ and wrote The Renaissance, was a favourite tutor of Oscar Wilde. Magdalen, Wilde’s college, employed the architects G. F. Bodley and Thomas Garner to design St. Swithun’s Quadrangle, one of the most sophisticated Victorian buildings in Oxford. Its complexity is comparable to T. G. Jackson’s Examination Schools in a Jacobean style, and Bodley and Garner’s Gothic Revival work for Christ Church College and its cathedral, which also features Morris & Co. stained glass. The city of ‘dreaming spires’ affords an extraordinary opportunity to experience the beauty and innovation of Victorian art and architecture.



ROME AND THE EAST: POLITICS, POWER AND RELIGION FROM THE BIRTH OF CHRISTIANITY UNTIL 1300

Dr Eileen Rubery           

Friday 16 – Sunday 18 September 2011

 £400

This three day study tour will explore relations between Rome and the East from the time that Saint Peter and Saint Paul came to Rome up until the time the papacy moved to France at the beginning of the 14th century. We will discuss the ‘Christianisation’ of Rome following Constantine the Great’s arrival and explore how art in Rome reflected struggles with the Eastern Empire over the nature of the balance between Christ’s humanity and divinity.  What effect did the Papacy’s defence of iconoclasm have on Roman art?  What did art in Carolingian Rome look like? Visits aim to include the church of S Maria Antiqua, (a complete church from the 6th- 9th century, full of frescoes with many eastern features, including the only western example of tetramorph angels) which is not normally open to the public; the catacombs of Saint Priscilla (which include many of the earliest Christian images from the 3rd and 4th centuries) and the Pope’s sancta sanctorum, the lavishly decorated private chapel of the Popes in the Lateran complex; also with restricted access.

HISTORIC GARDENS OF THE COTSWOLDS

NEW TOUR   

Dr Paula Henderson

Friday 23 – Sunday 25 September 2011

£350

The Cotswold hills, with their mellow stone cottages, elegant manor houses, and imposing castles, have some of the most important historic gardens in England.  This study trip will concentrate on gardens from the late 17th century to the early 20th century, beginning with a visit to Badminton House (home of the Duke and Duchess of Beaufort), where we will be accompanied by the eminent architectural historian, John Harris.  On Saturday, we will start at Croome Park, ‘Capability’ Brown’s first complete commission and the one on which he continued working throughout his life.  In the afternoon we will visit two of the quirkiest English landscape gardens: Painswick Rococo Garden and Sezincote (t.b.c.), a ‘Hindoo’ garden, partially attributed to Humphry Repton. Finally, on Sunday, we will concentrate on two 20th-century gardens: Hidcote, described by Vita Sackville-West as a ‘flawless example of what a garden should be’ and either Snowshill or Abbotswood.  Because of the distances involved, we will travel together by coach. The meeting point will be in Stow-on-the-Wold, which has hotels and B&Bs in all price ranges. 

 


CITIES OF PILGRIMS AND CRUSADERS: MEDIEVAL TOULOUSE AND ALBI

Dr Alexandra Gajewski

Friday 7 – Sunday 9 October 2011

 £400 

Walking in the footpath of pilgrims and crusaders, our Study Tour will be based in Toulouse , the ancient capital of the Languedoc , and include a day-trip to Albi, the city that gave its name to the Albigensian crusade. Toulouse , France ’s “ville rose”, has preserved large parts of its medieval cityscape: we will visit the vast, Romanesque abbey church of Saint-Sernin , the thirteenth-century Dominican church, the Gothic cathedral, and the Musée des Beaux Arts, housed in the fourteenth-century Augustinian convent. At Albi, we will visit the fortress-like cathedral with its fifteenth-century paintings, the bishop’s palace, and the vieil Albi (there will also be time to visit the Museum of Toulouse-Lautrec ). All along, we will discuss the turbulent history of the region which maintained its separate identity throughout the Middle Ages. 

POWER, FAITH AND SPLENDOUR: MADRID IN THE GOLDEN AGE OF THE HABSBURG AND BOURBON RULE

NEW TOUR   

Edward Payne

Friday 14 – Sunday 16 October 2011

£400

The city of Madrid served as both the seat of political power and the centre of artistic patronage throughout the Habsburg and Bourbon dynasties. The ‘Golden Age’ of Spain, which refers in particular to artworks produced during King Philip IV’s reign from 1621 to 1665, was a period marked by the rise of exceptional artistic achievement and the formation of rich painting collections in the capital. Chief among the artists of the Spanish School were Velázquez, court painter to Philip IV, and Ribera, the majority of whose career was spent in Naples, then a Spanish possession. Other distinctive figures who shaped the development of early modern Spanish art include El Greco, Zurbarán, Murillo and Goya. From museums to palaces, from El Greco to Goya, this study trip explores the striking wealth and diversity of works by these masters in Madrid, examining the intimate and problematic relations between art patronage, production and collection. Visits feature the outstanding collections of early modern Spanish paintings, prints and drawings in the Museo del Prado, the works on display in the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, the Real Academia de Bellas Artes, and a day trip to the Escorial. 


Public Programmes

Study Tours Archive: 2010



rome and the east: politics, power and religion from the birth of christianity until 1300

NEW TOUR
Dr Eileen Rubery

Friday 26 March – Sunday 28 March 2010

£400

This three day study tour will explore relations between Rome and the East from the time that Saint Peter and Saint Paul came to Rome up until the time the papacy moved to France at the beginning of the 14th century. We will discuss the ‘Christianisation’ of Rome following Constantine the Great’s arrival and explore how art in Rome reflected struggles with the Eastern Empire over the nature of the balance between Christ’s humanity and divinity.  What effect did the Papacy’s defence of iconoclasm have on Roman art?  What did art in Carolingian Rome look like? Visits aim to include the church of S Maria Antiqua, (a complete church from the 6th- 9th century, full of frescoes with many eastern features, including the only western example of tetramorph angels) which is not normally open to the public; the catacombs of Saint Priscilla (which include many of the earliest Christian images from the 3rd and 4th centuries) and the Pope’s sancta sanctorum, the lavishly decorated private chapel of the Popes in the Lateran complex; also with restricted access.

Forged by Many Cultures: Sicily through the Ages

NEW TOUR

James McDonaugh

Thursday 29 April – Sunday 2 May 2010

£500

‘To have seen Italy without having seen Sicily is not to have seen Italy at all, for Sicily is the clue to everything’ (Goethe, ‘Italian Journey’, 13 April 1787). This tour is designed to provide an overview of the layers of history that make Sicily arguably the richest region for art and architecture in Italy. The line of Sicily’s rulers has included Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Arabs, Normans, Hohenstaufen emperors, Angevins, Aragonese, Spanish Hapsburgs, Spanish Viceroys and even the British. The result is an unparalleled mix of cultural influences, which led the author of ‘The Leopard’ Giuseppe de Lampedusa to describe Sicily as ‘…the America of antiquity’. We will focus on the western region of the island;  based  in Palermo, we will visit  key sites in the city and its environs:  the Greek temple and theatre at Segesta, Roman bronzes in the archaeological museum in Palermo, the great Norman mosaics at Monreale, and the sumptuous Sicilian baroque of Palermo. In particular we will focus on how artistic styles from very different backgrounds coalesce to form a single thread, for example the hybrid Arab-Norman architecture of the 12th century. 



from god's castle to the heavenly jerusalem: the cathedrals of ely and lincoln

Professor Paul Crossley

Friday 7 May to – Saturday 8 May 2010

£200

Ely and Lincoln best represent the power and piety of English medieval architecture and offer contrasting, but complementary visions of what a great cathedral should look like. Ely was a Fenland Benedictine monastery, and its flourishing cult of St Etheldreda ensured that its great church would always be a splendid backdrop for pilgrims and pilgrimage.  Ely is rich in visual delights and also offers a special insight into how liturgy and space articulate an interior, and shape the church’s outlook onto the world beyond its monastery.  Its crossing tower, the famous ‘octagon’ is a spectacular mixture of carpentry and masonry, and it dominates the fens like a vision of St Etheldreda’s crown. Lincoln, by contrast, was a secular cathedral, administered by canons, and the site of one of the most prestigious cathedral schools in Europe.  Its west front has one of the most extensive cycles of Romanesque sculpture in England.  But unlike Ely most of the present cathedral was built to a relatively uniform style in the 13th century, and with a confidence and ingenuity that makes it the masterpiece of English high medieval architecture.  Like Ely it was a pilgrimage church, and its architecture and decoration underline that special function.  It was also the product of three architects of genius, so it offers us a unique insight into the workings of the English architectural imagination.  Lincoln, like Ely, dominates its landscape; its towers echoing those of the Heavenly City – ‘the many-towered city of Sion’.


amsterdam, the hague and rotterdam: netherlandish art of the golden age

Dr Matthias Vollmer

Friday 27 August – Sunday 29 August 2010

£400

In the 17th century, the arts, sciences and trade flourished to an unprecedented degree in the cities of the prosperous Low Countries.  Production of the fine and decorative arts thrived in Antwerp, Amsterdam, Delft, Haarlem and Utrecht and artists like Rembrandt, Rubens and Vermeer excelled in different artistic genres. History painting, portraiture, genre, landscape and still life painting all produced significant masterpieces in this period, which is rightly regarded as the Golden age of Netherlandish art.  We shall explore the development and variety of artistic expression in front of the originals in the outstanding collections of the museums in Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam.


byzantine istanbul

Dr Cecily Hennessy

Wednesday 1 September – Saturday 4 September 2010

£500

The great city of Constantinople lay at the heart of Byzantium and was to surpass Rome in its wealth and reputation. We examine the political and religious sites that remain in Istanbul, one of the most beautifully situated cities and itself a vibrant and fascinating centre. Visits include secular architecture, such as the massive city walls and a huge underground cistern, several former churches, including the legendary sixth-century church of Hagia Sophia and the Kariye Camii with its brilliant mosaics, as well as the vestiges of the renowned imperial palace and the fine archaeological museum. We also visit less well-known sites, such as the Fetiye Camii with its exquisite late Byzantine decorations, and examine the influence of Byzantium on the great Ottoman architect of the sixteenth century, Sinan.


with optional link to



byzantine cappadocia

NEW TOUR
Dr Cecily Hennessy

Sunday 5 September – Wednesday 8 September 2010

NEW TOUR

£500

In the heart of central Turkey, the region of Cappadocia has an astonishing landscape with stunning rock creations which contain a wealth of rock cut churches and monasteries from the Byzantine period. Many of these were painted with expressive and beautifully coloured paintings. Significant in preserving iconography and painting styles from the early years of Byzantium perhaps even from before Iconoclasm, the region also has key paintings from the 10th to 12th centuries. We will be based in Göreme, which itself has a group of important churches and take day excursions to valleys in the area to see some of the lesser known sites. There will be some walking, which may be steep and rugged.

This course may be taken in conjunction with the trip to Istanbul or separate from it.

Suggestions will be made for hotels in Göreme and Istanbul. A Turkish guide will accompany both trips. Travel during each course is provided.


AT HOME IN PARIS

Dr Caroline Levitt

Friday 17 September – Sunday 19 September 2010

£400

N.B: We regret that this tour had to be cancelled.

By visiting the homes and studios of artists and architects from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, we will build up an unusual and intimate narrative of the development of this period of art will be built up. The tour begins with the museum inaugurated by Gustave Moreau in his own house, where he taught his students, including  Matisse, Marquet and Rouault; André Breton, poet and leader of the Surrealists, visited Moreau’s museum-home and left profoundly affected. We will see the reconstructed studios of Breton and the sculptors Brancusi, Bourdelle and Zadkine, and will have a rare opportunity to visit the studio of Chana Orloff, which is conserved in a private home. Just outside of Paris, in Chambourcy, is the studio of André Derain and we will spend an afternoon there. Finally, Le Corbusier, known mainly for his architecture, was also a proficient artist, sculptor and tapestry-designer: we will examine his apartment-studio in Auteuil. This study tour requires no previous knowledge, but participants may be interested in Caroline Levitt’s Summer school course, which will introduce related issues.


art and architecture in renaissance rome

Dr Michael Douglas-Scott

Thursday 23 September - Sunday 26 September 2010

£500

This study trip will centre upon the achievements of the ‘High Renaissance’ in Rome in the early decades of the 16th century.  There will be two visits to the Vatican to consider the Sistine Chapel, the papal apartments decorated by Raphael and the Belvedere courtyard with its collection of antiquities, including the ‘Laocoon’ and the ‘Apollo Belvedere’.  In addition to St. Peter’s, other churches like Sta. Maria del Popolo, S. Pietro in Montorio (especially Bramante’s ‘Tempietto’) and S. Pietro in Vincoli (for Michelangelo’s Julius II tomb) will be included in the itinerary, as will secular buildings such as the Villa Farnesina (with its mythological frescoes) and some Renaissance palaces. We will also visit The Capitol and its museum and place all these famous sites within the context of the urban renewal which the ‘eternal city’ underwent during this highly creative period.


the papal court of avignon

Dr Alexandra Gajewski

Friday 8 October – Sunday 10 October 2010

£400

Avignon, the city of the popes, is situated in the south of France and within a short distance of the Alps and Italy.  In 1309 the French pope Clement V moved the papal court from Rome to Avignon and the city remained the seat of successive popes and anti-popes until 1415.  During this time, papal patronage attracted artists from north and south of the Alps making Avignon a veritable melting pot of artistic production.  We will visit the papal palace, the Musée du Petit Palais and other important sites of the city, such as the cathedral Notre-Dame which houses papal tombs and the city fortifications.  One of the days will be spent on the other bank of the river Rhone, in Villeneuve-les-Avignon, to visit the Carthusian monastery founded by Pope Innocent VI.  We will also see the collegiate church of Notre-Dame and discuss Enguerrand Quarton’s painting of the Coronation of the Virgin from 1453.

Public Programmes

Study Tours Archive: 2009

 

Thessaloniki: The 'Co-Queen' of Byzantium

Dr Cecily Hennessy
Friday 27 March - Sunday 29 March 2009
£400

 

Thessaloniki was a major Roman town and the main Byzantine centre in northern Greece until the fifteenth century, second only to Constantinople. It is now a vibrant city with a lively atmosphere steeped in its history and has several World Heritage sites. It has unparalleled early mosaics as well as remarkable decorations from later times. From the early period, these include a beautiful centrally planned building, the rotunda or Hagios Georgios, with idealised youthful saints, an exquisite apse mosaic in the church of Hosios David and remarkable pre-iconoclastic mosaics dated to the fifth and sixth centuries in the church of the city's patron saint, the beloved Demetrios. The churches from the later period include Hagia Sophia with its Virgin and Child in the apse, and the Panayia Halkeion as well as Saint Nicolaos Orphanos with paintings of the Saint's life.

Please note that Cecily Hennessy is also teaching a summer school course on the inception of early Christian art (13-17 July).

 

BYZANTINE ISTANBUL

Dr Cecily Hennessy
Thursday 16 April - Sunday 19 April 2009
£500

The great city of Constantinople lay at the heart of Byzantium and was to surpass Rome in its wealth and reputation. We examine the political and religious sites that remain in Istanbul, one of the most beautifully situated cities and itself a vibrant and fascinating centre. Visits include secular architecture, such as the massive city walls and a huge underground cistern, several former churches, including the legendary sixth-century church of Hagia Sophia and the Kariye Camii with its brilliant mosaics, as well as the vestiges of the renowned imperial palace and the fine archaeological museum. We also visit less well-known sites, such as the Fetiye Camii with its exquisite late Byzantine decorations, and examine the influence of Byzantium on the great Ottoman architect of the sixteenth century, Sinan.

You may also be interested in Cecily Hennessy’s summer school course on ‘Art and Society in Constantinople’ (20-24 July 2009).

 

FROM GOD'S CASTLE TO THE HEAVENLY JERUSALEM.  THE CATHEDRALS OF ELY AND LINCOLN

Professor Paul Crossley

Friday 8 May - Saturday 9 May 2009

£200

Ely and Lincoln best represent the power and piety of English medieval architecture and offer contrasting, but complementary visions of what a great cathedral should look like. Ely was a Fenland Benedictine monastery, and its flourishing cult of St Etheldreda ensured that its great church would always be a splendid backdrop for pilgrims and pilgrimage.  Ely is rich in visual delights and also offers a special insight into how liturgy and space articulate an interior, and shape the church’s outlook onto the world beyond its monastery.  Its crossing tower, the famous ‘octagon’ is a spectacular mixture of carpentry and masonry, and it dominates the fens like a vision of St Etheldreda’s crown. Lincoln, by contrast, was a secular cathedral, administered by canons, and the site of one of the most prestigious cathedral schools in Europe.  Its west front has one of the most extensive cycles of Romanesque sculpture in England.  But unlike Ely most of the present cathedral was built to a relatively uniform style in the thirteenth century, and with a confidence and ingenuity that makes it the masterpiece of English high medieval architecture.  Like Ely it was a pilgrimage church, and its architecture and decoration underline that special function.  It was also the product of three architects of genius, so it offers us a unique insight into the workings of the English architectural imagination.  Lincoln, like Ely, dominates its landscape; its towers echoing those of the Heavenly City – ‘the many-towered city of Sion’.

 

AMSTERDAM, THE HAGUE AND ROTTERDAM: NETHERLANDISH ART OF THE GOLDEN AGE

Dr Matthias Vollmer

Friday 28 August - Sunday 30 August 2009

£400

In the seventeenth century, the arts, sciences and trade flourished to an unprecedented degree in the cities of the prosperous Low Countries.  Production of the fine and decorative arts thrived in Antwerp, Amsterdam, Delft, Haarlem and Utrecht and artists like Rembrandt, Rubens and Vermeer excelled in different artistic genres. History painting, portraiture, genre, landscape and still life painting all produced significant masterpieces in this period, which is rightly regarded as the Golden Age of Netherlandish art.  We shall explore the development and variety of artistic expression in front of the originals in the outstanding collections of the museums in Amsterdam, The Hague and Rotterdam.


BERLIN: ART IN GERMANY FROM THE MIDDLE AGES TO THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

Dr Matthias Vollmer

Friday 4 September - Sunday 6 September 2009

£400

This study tour will introduce you to Berlin’s outstanding art collections, with their wide range of masterpieces from late medieval times to the present day, and also take you on a trip to the nearby city of Magdeburg to visit its impressive gothic cathedral.  We shall focus throughout on the particular circumstances that shaped the production and reception of German art, especially during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. During this long period, the formation of a German nation state and the problematic notion of a German national identity became intimately connected to the question of a German style and artistic expressions.  We shall explore Germany’s vibrant art history by focusing in depth on works by artists like Martin Schongauer and Albrecht Dürer, Caspar David Friedrich, Karl Friedrich Schinkel and Adolph Menzel, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Otto Dix, Joseph Beuys and Anselm Kiefer. In addition to our trip to Magdeburg, we shall visit the following museums and galleries in Berlin: the Gemäldegalerie, the Bodemuseum, the Kupferstichkabinett (Collection of Drawings and Prints), the Nationalgalerie, and the Hamburger Bahnhof Museum.

 

RENAISSANCE VENICE

Dr Michael Douglas-Scott

Thursday 17 September - Sunday 20 September 2009

£500

The unique visual form the Renaissance assumed in Venice will be the focus of this tour. We shall begin in the main square with a consideration of the political imagery of the city and the projection of its ‘myth’ there and in the nearby Doge’s Palace. The patronage of the lay confraternities or ‘scuole’ will then be appreciated at their magnificent meeting halls with narrative cycles by Carpaccio and others. There will be a focus on the development of the altarpiece and the Dogal tomb, above all in the context of the two great mendicant churches of SS. Giovanni e Paolo and the Frari. The gradual establishment of classical norms will also be studied in domestic and in ecclesiastical architecture, by looking at Gothic and Renaissance palaces along the Grand Canal and at churches designed by Codussi, Sansovino and Palladio. The Accademia Gallery and the Correr Museum will underpin our exploration of the history of Venetian painting from the Vivarini and Bellini families through to Giorgione, Titian, Veronese and Tintoretto.



AT HOME IN PARIS

Caroline Levitt

Thursday 24 September - 27 September 2009

£500

By visiting the homes and studios of artists and architects from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, we shall build up an unusual and intimate narrative of the development of this period of art. The tour begins with the museum inaugurated by Gustave Moreau in his own house, where he taught his students, including Matisse, Marquet and Rouault; André Breton, poet and leader of the Surrealists, visited Moreau’s museum-home and left profoundly affected. We shall see the reconstructed studios of Breton and the sculptors Brancusi, Bourdelle and Zadkine. Looking at sculptures will introduce the various ways in which artists at this time used, manipulated and distorted notions of classicism, a theme that will return in the work of Aristide Maillol and of Chana Orloff, whose studio is conserved in a private home and which we shall have a rare opportunity to visit. Finally, Le Corbusier, known mainly for his architecture, was also a proficient artist, sculptor and tapestry-designer: we shall examine his apartment-studio in Auteuil as well as the home he designed for the banker Raoul La Roche.

This study tour requires no previous knowledge, but participants may be interested in Caroline Levitt’s Summer school course (3-7 August), which will introduce related issues.



MONTPELLIER AND MEDIEVAL LANGUEDOC

Dr Alexandra Gajewski

Friday 9 October - Sunday 11 October 2009

£400

This study tour will visit some of the major sites of the medieval south of France and will include discussions on Romanesque and Gothic architecture and sculpture, and on medieval town planning.   The focus will be the city of Montpellier, one of the main economic and artistic centres of the medieval Languedoc.  Situated in the alluvial plain that descends from the Cevennes Mountains to the Mediterranean Sea, the city is first mentioned in the tenth century.  It quickly gained international prestige from trade with Genoa and Pisa, its celebrated university, and the political association with the kings of Aragon and of Mallorca; and just when the Black Death threatened to ruin its prosperity, it benefited from the support of the popes in Avignon.  We shall recreate the medieval cityscape that grew up around the first castle from the eleventh century, visit museums, the present cathedral (formerly the late Gothic chapel of a university college), and the twelfth-century church at Castelnau-le-Lez.  Until 1536, Montpellier had no cathedral.  We shall visit the Romanesque cathedral at Maguelone, a remote site situated on the coast among salt-lakes and flamingos.  Finally, a trip to the medieval town of Agde, which developed from a sixth-century Phoenician colony and shelters a fortified cathedral within its city walls, will offer a compelling comparison with Montpellier.

Public Programmes

Study Tours Archive: 2008

 

Ravenna: City of Mosaics

Dr Cecily Hennessy
Friday 15 February - Sunday 17 February 2008
£400

Ravenna is a marvel of Early Christian and Byzantine mosaics, housed in buildings dating to the fifth and sixth centuries when the city was the capital of the Roman Empire in the west. With a superbly decorated jewel-like mausoleum, built by Galla Placidia, two early baptisteries, and the beautifully designed biblical and imperial mosaics in San Vitale, the sites in Ravenna reveal the intrigue of history, theological rivalry and lavish patronage. The tour also visited San Apollinare in Classe.


Art and Architecture in Renaissance Rome

Dr Michael Douglas-Scott

Thursday 27 March-Sunday 30 March 2008
£500

This course focused on the achievements of the “High Renaissance” in Rome, c. 1500-1527. There were two visits to the Vatican to consider the Sistine Chapel, the papal apartments decorated by Raphael and the Belvedere courtyard with its collection of antiquities,and included the ‘Laocoon’ and the ‘Apollo Belvedere’. In addition to St. Peter’s, other churches like Sta. Maria del Popolo, S. Pietro in Montorio (especially Bramante’s ‘Tempietto’) and S. Pietro in Vincoli (for Michelangelo’s Julius II tomb) were included on the itinerary as was secular buildings such as the Villa Farnesina with its mythological frescoes and, the Villa Madama. These monuments were placed within the context of the urban renewal, which the eternal city underwent during this highly creative period.

Byzantine Istanbul

Dr Cecily Hennessy
Thursday 17April - Sunday 20 April 2008
£500

The great city of Constantinople lay at the heart of Byzantium and was to surpass Rome in its wealth and reputation. We examined the political and religious sites that remain in Istanbul, one of the most beautifully situated cities and itself a vibrant and fascinating centre. Visits included secular architecture, such as the massive city walls and a huge underground cistern, several churches, including the legendary sixth-century church of Hagia Sophia and the Kariye Camii with its brilliant mosaics, as well as the vestiges of the renowned imperial palace and the fine archaeological museum. We were fortunate to gain access to several sites that are not normally open to the public.

Pompeii & Herculaneum: Reflections in Art

Prof Robin Cormack
Friday 16 May - Sunday 18 May, 2008
£400

This study tour explored some of the monuments and decorations of Pompeii and Herculaneum, and ended with a visit to the Museum of Archaeology in Naples, where many of the frescoes and other artefacts from Pompeii are on display. The tour also visited the Villa of Poppaea at Oplontis and saw the Carravagio altarpiece of the Seven Acts of Mercy in Naples.



Art in Berlin – From the Pergamon Museum to the Berlinische Galerie

Matthias Vollmer
Thursday 28 August-Sunday 31 August , 2008
£500

The Study Tour offered an overview of Berlin’s unique collections and their wide range of outstanding artworks from ancient Egyptian art represented by the iconic bust of Nefertiti to modern art as presented by Cy Twombly, Robert Rauschenberg, Joseph Beuys and Anselm Kiefer and included a closer look on some aspects of the particularities of art in Germany. The examination of the artistic expressions of different epochs and art movements was the main thread that the tour followed through the individual museums. This was combined with an overview of major artistic developments and a focus on key artists and movements.

Toulouse and Albi

Dr Alexandra Gajewski
Friday 5 September-Sunday 7 September, 2008
£400

Walking in the footpath of pilgrims and crusaders, our Study Tour was based in Toulouse, the ancient capital of the Languedoc, and included a day-trip to Albi, the city that gave its name to the Albigensian crusade. Toulouse, France’s “ville rose”, has preserved large parts of its medieval cityscape: we visited the vast, Romanesque abbey church of Saint-Sernin, the thirteenth-century Dominican church, the Gothic cathedral, and the Musée des Beaux Arts, housed in the fourteenth-century Augustinian convent. At Albi, we visited the fortress-like cathedral with its fifteenth-century paintings, the bishop’s palace, and the vieil Albi (where there was time to visit the Museum of Toulouse-Lautrec). During the tour we discussed the turbulent history of the region which maintained its separate identity throughout the Middle Ages.