Classical seminar: Roman Art
Monday, 16 January 2006
17.00 – 18.30, Seminar Room 1
Discoveries: The New Paintings from Terzigno and the Problem of Megalographies
Speaker(s): Professor Eric M Moormann (Radboud University, Nijmegen)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Peter Stewart

Words Made Fresh?
Oral Histories: Pitfalls, Potentials, and Methodologies

Monday, 16 January 2006
17.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre
Speaker(s): Hester Westley (Courtauld Institute of Art)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Sarah Wilson
Further information: When contemporary art history includes living artists’ own testimonies, a number of complications immediately arise: What is the reliability of personal memory? How does testimony influence narrative? And how does an academic, at either MA or PhD. level, transform conflicting accounts into a compelling argument about an issue? Eighteen months ago, Hester Westley attended a National Sound Archive seminar on the methodologies of oral history. The skills that she honed in this one-day seminar prepared her for the research she has integrated in her PhD. thesis, “Rites of Passage: Tradition and Transmission at St. Martin’s School of Art, 1958-1978.” Hester looks forward to directing an informal seminar on the ethical, practical, and theoretical questions that oral history methodology comprises. A practical introduction to the field of oral history, this seminar will include a number of detailed examples from her work and is open to all students

Distinguished Teachers:
Archaeologies of the Standpoint - Opening lecture

Spring 2006 Friends Lecture Series

Tuesday, 17 January 2006
17.30 – 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre
Speaker(s): Professor Whitney Davis (University of California, Berkeley)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Professor Patricia Rubin
Further information: The 2006 series celebrates the Courtauld Institute’s tradition of research-led teaching with a series of lectures by teachers who, in addition to leading their fields through their scholarship have also inspired and trained others and who continue to do so through their teaching and writing. In addition to inviting internationally renowned teachers, the series includes the inaugural lectures of two Courtauld professors.

Research Seminar: Renaissance section
Wednesday, 18 January 2006
17.30, Seminar Room 4
Framing the Miraculous: the uses of perspective
Speaker(s): Dr Paul Davies (University of Reading)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Professor Paul Hills

7th East Wing Collection
Friday, 20 January 2006
19.00 – 23.00, Courtauld Institute of Art – various rooms
Opening: Culture Bound
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Students at the Courtauld Institute of Art

Research seminar: Modern and Contemporary section
Monday, 23 January 2006
17.30, Seminar Room 1
Don't let me disappear': the adolescent condition in contemporary art in America and the UK
Speaker(s): Kate Random Love (Courtauld Institute)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Julian Stallabrass

London seminar for Early Modern Visual Culture
Monday, 23 January 2006
18.00, Seminar room 3, History of Art Department, University College London, 39-41 Gordon Square, London WC1
‘Something rich and strange’: thinking about coral and its representation’
Speaker(s): Marcia Pointon (University of Manchester)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Maria Loh (m.loh@ucl.ac.uk), Sarah Monks (sarah.monks@courtauld.ac.uk), Rose Marie San Juan (r.sanjuan@ucl.ac.uk), Katie Scott (katie.scott@courtauld.ac.uk), Richard Taws (r.taws@ucl.ac.uk)
Further information: This seminar series has been organised jointly by the Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum and UCL. 

Research Forum Visiting Professor programme
Wednesday, 25 January 2006
17.00, Seminar Room 4
Archaeologies of the Standpoint: Prehistoric Palimpsests and Petroglyphic Palindromes
Speaker(s): Professor Whitney Davis (University of California, Berkeley)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Professor Patricia Rubin
Further information: The lectures and colloquia in this series will deal with the ways in which standpoints of visual access to works of art (usually if not always integrated into some kind of architectural setting or architectonic envelope) have been conceptualised and manipulated historically in different cultural traditions and with the kinds of technical art theories that have emerged to account for them. One of the main themes will be the contrast between those cultural traditions, and examples will be drawn from prehistoric North African, ancient Egyptian, classical Greek, perhaps Spanish medieval, Renaissance Italian, British eighteenth century, early twentieth century modernism, and contemporary digitally-mediated technologies.


Classical seminar: Roman Art:
Monday, 30 January 2006
17.00 – 18.30, Seminar Room 1
Discoveries: Ethnicity in Roman Portraiture
Speaker(s): Dr Elizabeth Bartman (Courtauld Research Forum Associate Scholar)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Peter Stewart

London seminar for Early Modern Visual Culture

Monday, 30 January 2006
18.00, Seminar room 3, History of Art Department, University College London, 39-41 Gordon Square, London WC1
Sharing in Campaspe’s Favours: portrayal and beauty in Francisco de Holanda’s Da Tirar polo Naturale, c.1550’
Speaker(s): Joanna Woodall (Courtauld Institute of Art)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Maria Loh (m.loh@ucl.ac.uk), Sarah Monks (sarah.monks@courtauld.ac.uk), Rose Marie San Juan (r.sanjuan@ucl.ac.uk), Katie Scott (katie.scott@courtauld.ac.uk), Richard Taws (r.taws@ucl.ac.uk)
Further information: This seminar series has been organised jointly by the Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum and UCL. 

Research Forum Visiting Professor programme
Tuesday, 31 January 2006
17.00, Seminar Room 1
Archaeologies of the Standpoint: The Mystical Horizons of the Lamb: The End of the World in Medieval and Early Modern Apocalypses
Speaker(s): Professor Whitney Davis (University of California, Berkeley)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Professor Patricia Rubin
Further information: The lectures and colloquia in this series will deal with the ways in which standpoints of visual access to works of art (usually if not always integrated into some kind of architectural setting or architectonic envelope) have been conceptualised and manipulated historically in different cultural traditions and with the kinds of technical art theories that have emerged to account for them. One of the main themes will be the contrast between those cultural traditions, and examples will be drawn from prehistoric North African, ancient Egyptian, classical Greek, perhaps Spanish medieval, Renaissance Italian, British eighteenth century, early twentieth century modernism, and contemporary digitally-mediated technologies.

 


February


Research Forum Visiting Professor programme
Thursday, 2 February 2006
17.00, Seminar Room 1
Archaeologies of the Standpoint: On Being Short: Brunelleschi's Invention of Linear Perspective
Speaker(s): Professor Whitney Davis (University of California, Berkeley)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Professor Patricia Rubin
Further information: The lectures and colloquia in this series will deal with the ways in which standpoints of visual access to works of art (usually if not always integrated into some kind of architectural setting or architectonic envelope) have been conceptualised and manipulated historically in different cultural traditions and with the kinds of technical art theories that have emerged to account for them. One of the main themes will be the contrast between those cultural traditions, and examples will be drawn from prehistoric North African, ancient Egyptian, classical Greek, perhaps Spanish medieval, Renaissance Italian, British eighteenth century, early twentieth century modernism, and contemporary digitally-mediated technologies.

11th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Student Colloquium
Saturday, 4 February 2006
10.00 – 17.00, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre (doors open 9.30)
Peregrinations: Art and Architecture in the Middle Ages
Speaker(s): Anthea Stevens (Courtauld Institute), Eileen Rubery (Courtauld Institute), Melena Naydenova (Courtauld Institute), Ghislaine Heylen (Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven), Kathryn Gerry (John Hopkins University, Baltimore), Frances Narkiewicz (Trinity College, Dublin), Danielle O'Donovan (Trinity College, Dublin), Lev Kapitaikin (Wolfson College, Oxford), Francesco Lucchini (Courtauld Institute), Frederico Botana (Courtauld Institute)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Postgraduate students of the Courtauld Institute of Art
Further information: The colloquium will cover the themes of travelling and movement in medieval times, whether in respect of objects, ideas or individuals.
For local arrangements contact: beatrice.keefe@courtauld.ac.uk
View Programme
View Abstracts


Research seminar: Modern and Contemporary section
Monday, 6 February 2006
17.30, Seminar Room 1
Beyond resolution: digital enlargement in Angela Bulloch's pixel-based works
Speaker(s): Rachel Wells (Courtauld Institute)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Julian Stallabrass

Courtauld Postgraduate Research Symposium
Thursday 9 February and Friday 10 February 2006
14.30 - 18.00, Thursday, 9 February
11.30 - 17.30, Friday, 10 February
Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre
Speaker(s): Adele Tan, Judith Batalion, Noah Horowitz, Sarah James, Dominic Johnson, Beatrice Keefe, Manjit Debashis, Abigail Price, Scott Ruby, Rachel Sloan, Karin Kyburz, Edouard Kopp, Marie Kokkori, and Danielle Carrabino
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: postgraduate students of the Courtauld Institute of Art
Further information: Contact Adele Tan Wei.Tan@courtauld.ac.uk or Danielle Carrabino  Danielle.Carrabino@courtauld.ac.uk for further information
View the programme

Research Forum Visiting Professor programme
Wednesday, 8 February 2006
17.00, Seminar Room 1
Archaeologies of the Standpoint: Desire in Limbo: William Beckford's Fonthill Abbey
Speaker(s): Professor Whitney Davis (University of California, Berkeley)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Professor Patricia Rubin
Further information: The lectures and colloquia in this series will deal with the ways in which standpoints of visual access to works of art (usually if not always integrated into some kind of architectural setting or architectonic envelope) have been conceptualised and manipulated historically in different cultural traditions and with the kinds of technical art theories that have emerged to account for them. One of the main themes will be the contrast between those cultural traditions, and examples will be drawn from prehistoric North African, ancient Egyptian, classical Greek, perhaps Spanish medieval, Renaissance Italian, British eighteenth century, early twentieth century modernism, and contemporary digitally-mediated technologies.

Conference
Saturday 11 February 2006
09.45 – 18.00, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre
Study day on the History of Russian Photography, 1840-1940
Speaker(s): David Elliott (Director, Mori Museum, Tokyo), Larry Schaaf (Slade Professor of Fine Art, University of Oxford), Edward Kasinec (Curator of Slavic and Baltic Division, New York Public Library), Richard Pare (Former Curator of Photography, Canadian Center for Architecture, Montreal), Gallina Miroliubova (Curator of Photography, The State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg), Elena Barkhatova (Curator of Photography, National Library, St Petersburg), Dominique de Font-Réaulx (Curator of Photography, Musée d'Orsay, Paris), Lindy Grant (Keeper of the Conway Library, Courtauld Institute of Art).
Ticket/entry details: £25 (includes coffee and tea breaks, lunch and drinks reception) (Free admission for Courtauld staff and students)  To book please contact:
by email: researchforum@courtauld.ac.uk or by telephone on 020 7848 2909. We recommend that you send a cheque made payable to the “Courtauld Institute of Art” by post to: Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN clearly stating that you wish to book for the study day.
Organised by: Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum and the UK Friends of the Hermitage
Further information: The aim of the study day is to explore the historical development of photography in Russia. While photography in the UK, France, America and elsewhere in Europe has been extensively researched and much has been published, the story of photography in Russia is, by comparison, little known. It is also intended as a means of gathering ideas for a future photography exhibition in the Hermitage Rooms at Somerset House, tentatively scheduled for October 2007. This conference has been sponsored by the financial services group, WMG Advisors LLP.
View the programme (please note you will need to arrive before 09.45 on the day to sign in)

Classical seminar: Roman Art:
Monday, 13 February 2006
17.00 – 18.30, Seminar Room 1
Discoveries: Two Arches and Too Many Emperors: Examples of Re-Use in Late Antique Rome
Speaker(s): Professor Paolo Liverani (Vatican Museums/University of Florence)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Peter Stewart

Spring 2006 Friends Lecture Series
Tuesday, 14 February 2006
17.30 – 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre
Distinguished Teachers: Inaugural Lecture: The Integrated Cathedral - Thoughts on 'Holism' and Gothic Architecture
Speaker(s): Professor Paul Crossley (Courtauld Institute of Art)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Professor Patricia Rubin
Further information: The 2006 series celebrates the Courtauld Institute’s tradition of research-led teaching with a series of lectures by teachers who, in addition to leading their fields through their scholarship have also inspired and trained others and who continue to do so through their teaching and writing. In addition to inviting internationally renowned teachers, the series includes the inaugural lectures of two Courtauld professors.

Research Forum Visiting Professor programme
Wednesday, 15 February 2006
17.00, Research Forum Seminar Room
Archaeologies of the Standpoint: Intersubjective Standpoints and Our "Form of Life": Ludwig Wittgenstein's House for His Sister
Speaker(s): Professor Whitney Davis (University of California, Berkeley)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Professor Patricia Rubin
Further information: The lectures and colloquia in this series will deal with the ways in which standpoints of visual access to works of art (usually if not always integrated into some kind of architectural setting or architectonic envelope) have been conceptualised and manipulated historically in different cultural traditions and with the kinds of technical art theories that have emerged to account for them. One of the main themes will be the contrast between those cultural traditions, and examples will be drawn from prehistoric North African, ancient Egyptian, classical Greek, perhaps Spanish medieval, Renaissance Italian, British eighteenth century, early twentieth century modernism, and contemporary digitally-mediated technologies.

Research seminar: Medieval Work in Progress section
Thursday, 16 February 2006
17.00, Research Forum Seminar Room
Re-interpreting the ambiguous: Pilate in early Christian art
Speaker(s): Dr Colum Hourihane (Index of Christian Art, Princeton)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Lindy Grant


Modern and Contemporary section: Special Event
Friday, 17 February 2006
17.00, Research Forum Seminar Room
Angels of History: Moscow Conceptualism

Angels of History


Speaker(s): Joseph Backstein (Institute of Contemporary Art, Moscow)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Sarah Wilson
Further information: Joseph Backstein, Director of the Institute of Contemporary Art, Moscow, and Director of the current Moscow Biennale (January- February 2006), recently curated the exhibition Angels of History: Moscow Conceptualism and its Influence for the MuHKA, Antwerp, as part of the recent Europalia Russia Festival in Belgium. He will talk about Moscow Conceptualism, its founders, continuations and development in the new Research Forum Seminar Room at the Courtauld Institute of Art.


Research seminar: Modern and Contemporary section
Monday, 20 February 2006
17.30, Seminar Room 1
Realism/criticism
Speaker(s): Matthew Arnatt (Goldsmiths College)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Julian Stallabrass


London seminar for Early Modern Visual Culture
Tuesday, 21 February 2006
18.00, Seminar room 3, History of Art Department, University College London, 39-41 Gordon Square, London WC1
The social life of the late King's goods: the Commonwealth sale, 1649-1654’
Speaker(s): Jerry Brotton (Queen Mary, University of London)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Maria Loh (m.loh@ucl.ac.uk), Sarah Monks (sarah.monks@courtauld.ac.uk), Rose Marie San Juan (r.sanjuan@ucl.ac.uk), Katie Scott (katie.scott@courtauld.ac.uk), Richard Taws (r.taws@ucl.ac.uk)
Further information: This seminar series has been organised jointly by the Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum and UCL. 

Research Seminar: History of Photography
Wednesday, 22 February 2006
17.30 – 18.30, Research Forum Seminar Room
“Archaeological” Photography and the Creation of Histories within Colonial India
Speaker(s): Dr Sudeshna Guha (University of Cambridge)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Lindy Grant (lindy.grant@courtauld.ac.uk) and Dr Alexandra Moschovi (alexandra.moschovi@courtauld.ac.uk).
Further information: This year sees the launch of a new research seminar on the History of Photography, to be held at the Courtauld Institute of Art, under the aegis of the Courtauld Research Forum. There will be one seminar a term. The seminars will take place on Wednesday evenings at 5.30pm in the Research Forum, and the papers, and formal discussion, will be followed by less formal discussion over a glass of wine. We hope that the seminar will attract all interested researchers, whether independent, or from museums, galleries, heritage institutions or higher education, and will develop into a lively forum for discussion of the subject of the history of photography in its broadest sense.

Research seminar: Medieval Work in Progress section
Thursday, 23 February 2006
17.00, Research Forum Seminar Room
Experiments in early Gothic structure: the flying buttress
Speaker(s): Andrew Tallon (Columbia University)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Lindy Grant

Conference
Saturday, 25 February 2006
10.00 – 16.00 at the Courtauld Institute of Art (Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre and seminar rooms), then at the Hayward Gallery until 19.30
Art Switched On: A Symposium on Dan Flavin
Speaker(s): Speakers  include David Batchelor, Tiffany Bell, Alex Coles, Briony Fer, Paula Feldman, Mark Godfrey and Karsten Schubert
Ticket/entry details: £30 (£10 concessions) including entrance to the exhibition and drinks reception at the Hayward Gallery
Booking essential through the Hayward Gallery Box Office: 0870 169 1000
Organised by: Jacky Klein (Hayward Gallery) and Professor Patricia Rubin (Courtauld Institute of Art)
Further information: A one-day symposium to coincide with Dan Flavin: A Retrospective at the Hayward Gallery (19 January - 2 April 2006), a major exhibition presenting over fifty of Flavin's signature light works from the 1960s to the 1990s. Leading critics, writers, artists and academics look at Dan Flavin’s work and influence. The day will end with an opportunity to see the exhibition and a drinks reception in the Hayward's Waterloo Sunset Pavilion.
View the programme

Classical seminar: Roman Art:
Monday, 27 February 2006
17.00 – 18.30, Seminar Room 1
Discoveries: The House of Chaste Lovers in Pompeii and its Banquet Scenes
Speaker(s): David Bellingham (University of Manchester)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Peter Stewart

Spring 2006 Friends Lecture Series
Tuesday, 28 February 2006
17.30 – 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre
Distinguished Teachers: Inaugural Lecture: Towards an understanding of the Bibles moralisées
Speaker(s): Professor John Lowden (Courtauld Institute of Art)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Professor Patricia Rubin
Further information: The 2006 series celebrates the Courtauld Institute’s tradition of research-led teaching with a series of lectures by teachers who, in addition to leading their fields through their scholarship have also inspired and trained others and who continue to do so through their teaching and writing. In addition to inviting internationally renowned teachers, the series includes the inaugural lectures of two Courtauld professors.

Tiepolo, Kokoschka and Soviet mural painting
Seminar
Wednesday, 1 March 2006
18.00, Research Forum Seminar Room
Speaker(s): Dr Alexey Leporc (State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Barnaby Wright & Professor Patricia Rubin

Oskar Kokoschka
Oskar Kokoschka The Prometheus Triptych, 1950, (right-hand panel)
Courtauld Institute of Art

Further information: In 1950 Oskar Kokoschka completed his enormous Prometheus Triptych commissioned for the ceiling of Count Antoine Seilern’s London house at 56 Princes Gate. With this painting, now in the Courtauld Institute of Art Gallery’s collection, Kokoschka claimed himself the only heir to the great European Baroque tradition and specifically to the grand ceiling painting schemes of Tiepolo and Maulbertsch. In this highly original seminar presentation Dr Leporc will consider the extent to which Kokoschka should be seen as the sole and rightful heir to this tradition by comparing his work not only to those earlier masters but also to the contemporary work of the Soviet mural painters of the 1950s and 1960s.

Research seminar: Modern and Contemporary section
Monday, 6 March 2006
17.30, Seminar Room 1
Picasso's missing link: the role of Iberian sculpture in 'Les demoiselles d'Avignon'
Speaker(s): Silvia Loreti (Courtauld Institute)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Julian Stallabrass


Research Seminar: Renaissance section
Wednesday, 8 March 2006
18.00, Seminar Room 4
Images of the Virgin Mary and Marian Devotion in Early Modern Germany
Speaker(s): Dr Bridget Heal (University of St Andrews)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Susie Nash

ICMA lecture 2006
Thursday, 9 March 2006
17.30 – 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre
Annual International Center of Medieval Art (New York) Lecture in London – Cyprus and Jerusalem's Long Shadow: Building Holy Sepulchres in the Holy Isle
Speaker(s): Professor Annemarie Weyl Carr
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, admission free
Organised by: Dr Joanna Cannon
Further information: This lecture is presented by the Courtauld Institute of Art in association with the International Center of Medieval Art, New York and is supported by the Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum. The International Center of Medieval Art promotes the study of the visual arts of the Middle Ages in Europe. Its worldwide membership includes academics, museum professionals, students, and other enthusiasts. ICMA publishes a scholarly journal Gesta, a newsletter, and sponsors lectures and conference sessions.  Email: ICMA@medievalart.org, Website: http://www.medievalart.org.
Annual membership application forms for ICMA will be available at the lecture: Students $20 Others $60
Local arrangements:  Dr Joanna Cannon, Courtauld Institute of Art, email: joanna.cannon@courtauld.ac.uk.

London seminar for Early Modern Visual Culture
Monday, 13 March 2006
18.00, Seminar room 3, History of Art Department, University College London, 39-41 Gordon Square, London WC1
Paper-work: fabricating identity in revolutionary France’
Speaker(s): Richard Taws (UCL)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Maria Loh (m.loh@ucl.ac.uk), Sarah Monks (sarah.monks@courtauld.ac.uk), Rose Marie San Juan (r.sanjuan@ucl.ac.uk), Katie Scott (katie.scott@courtauld.ac.uk), Richard Taws (r.taws@ucl.ac.uk)
Further information: This seminar series has been organised jointly by the Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum and UCL. 

Spring 2006 Friends Lecture Series Seminar
Monday, 13 March 2006
16.00-18.00, Research Forum Seminar Room
Professor Linda Nochlin (Lila Acheson Wallace professor in Modern Art, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University) in conversation with Professor Tamar Garb (University College London)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Professor Patricia Rubin

Classical seminar: Roman Art:
Monday, 13 March 2006
17.00 – 18.30, Seminar Room 1
Discoveries: Sarcophagi and Citizenship at Aphrodisias in Caria
Speaker(s): Professor R R R Smith (University of Oxford)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Peter Stewart

Spring 2006 Friends Lecture Series
Tuesday, 14 March 2006
17.30 -18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre
Distinguished Teachers: Dislocating Tradition: Contemporary Women Artists, Painting and Sculpture
Speaker(s): Professor Linda Nochlin (Lila Acheson Wallace professor in Modern Art, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Professor Patricia Rubin
Further information: The 2006 series celebrates the Courtauld Institute’s tradition of research-led teaching with a series of lectures by teachers who, in addition to leading their fields through their scholarship have also inspired and trained others and who continue to do so through their teaching and writing. In addition to inviting internationally renowned teachers, the series includes the inaugural lectures of two Courtauld professors.

Joint Giotto's O/Renaissance Seminar
Monday, 20 March 2006
17.00, Research Forum Seminar Room
The miraculous image in late-medieval Italy, between legend and history
Speaker(s): Gervase Rosser (St. Catherine's College, Oxford)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Joanna Cannon

London seminar for Early Modern Visual Culture
Monday, 20 March 2006
18.00, Seminar room 3, History of Art Department, University College London, 39-41 Gordon Square, London WC1
Reading Group: On Materiality
Texts to be discussed:

  1. Lydia H Liu, ‘Robinson Crusoe’s earthenware pot’, Critical Inquiry, 25:4 (1999), 728-57
  2. Peter de Bolla, ‘Toward the Materiality of Aesthetic Experience’, Diacritics, 32:1 (2002), 19-37 –  or in PDF form here

    and suggested option,
  3. Juliet Fleming, ‘The Renaissance tattoo’, RES, 31 (1997)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Maria Loh (m.loh@ucl.ac.uk), Sarah Monks (sarah.monks@courtauld.ac.uk), Rose Marie San Juan (r.sanjuan@ucl.ac.uk), Katie Scott (katie.scott@courtauld.ac.uk), Richard Taws (r.taws@ucl.ac.uk)
Further information: This seminar series has been organised jointly by the Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum and UCL.

Research seminar: Modern and Contemporary section
Monday, 20 March 2006
17.30, Seminar Room 1
Reclaim the streets: social protest, photojournalism and 'activist photography'
Speaker(s): Antigoni Memou (Courtauld Institute)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Julian Stallabrass

Research seminar: Medieval Work in Progress section
Thursday, 23 March 2006
17.00, Research Forum Seminar Room
Pilgrims and prisoners in south Italy and  beyond: the medieval Monastery of San Leonardo in  'Lam Volara' (Siponto)
Speaker(s): Jessica Richardson (Courtauld Institute of Art)
Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organised by: Dr Lindy Grant



International Symposium
10-11 April 2006
09.15 - 19.30, Monday 10 April (registration from 08.45), Courtauld Institute of Art, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre, and Dulwich Picture Gallery
10.00 until approx. 13.00, Tuesday 11 April, Courtauld Institute of Art, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre
Heroism and Reportage: Winslow Homer: Poet of the Sea
Speaker(s): Tim Barringer (Yale University), Tom Gretton (University College London), Hollis Clayson (Northwestern University), Jennifer Greenhill (Yale University), Michael Leja (University of Pennsylvania), David Tatham (Syracuse University), Thierry Gervais (École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales and Société Française de Photographie), Ian Dejardin (Dulwich Picture Gallery), Marc Simpson (Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art and The Sterling and Francine Clark Institute and), Caroline Arscott (Courtauld Institute), Bruce Robertson (Los Angeles County Museum of Art), David Fraser Jenkins (independent scholar), Andre Dombrowski (Smith College), André Gunthert (École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales and Société Française de Photographie)
Ticket/entry details: £30 (£10 student concessions, including Courtauld staff) Includes exhibition entry, coach trip, catering, reception. To book please send a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Administrative Officer, Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, clearly stating that you wish to book for the Heroism and Reportage symposium. Alternatively, call (44) 020 7848 2909 to make a credit card booking by telephone, or send an email to researchforum@courtauld.ac.uk for further information.
Further information: This two-day international conference organised by the Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum in conjunction with the Terra Foundation for American Art will coincide with the exhibition Winslow Homer: Poet of the Sea (22 February to 21 May 2006) at the Dulwich Picture Gallery, co-organised with the Musée d’Art Américain Giverny and Terra Foundation for American Art. The conference will examine the context of Winslow Homer’s works in relation to the topics of heroism and reportage in the art of the second half of the nineteenth century. It will also include a visit to the exhibition at the Dulwich Picture Gallery and some of the papers will address the works of Winslow Homer. Other papers will select examples from geographical locations and cultural contexts in Britain and Europe.
View the Programme
View the Abstracts