RESEARCH SEMINAR: MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY
Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Abjection

Monday, 6 October 2008

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Lucetta Johnson (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Caroline Arscott



London seminar for Early Modern Visual Culture

The Pensive Image: The Case of Van Huysen’s Dewdrops

Monday, 6 October 2008

18.00, Seminar Room 1

Speaker(s): Hanneke Grootenboer (University of Oxford)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Mechthild Fend (m.fend@ucl.ac.uk) and Satish Padiyar (satish.padiyar@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: This seminar series has been organised jointly by the Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum and University College London.



CAROLINE VILLERS RESEARCH FELLOW LECTURE

Theory and Practice: Paintings by Alexander Rodchenko – An Introduction to Forthcoming Technical Historical Investigations

Tuesday, 7 October 2008

18.00, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr Maria Kokkori (Caroline Villers Research Fellow 2008-09, Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Aviva Burnstock

Further information: Dr Maria Kokkori, the newly appointed Caroline Villers Research Fellow for 2008-09, will give an introductory talk on her research project relating to theory and practice on Rodchenko works.



Research seminar: Renaissance

Fiesole: A Penitential Landscape?

Wednesday, 15 October 2008

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr Amanda Lillie (Department of Art History, University of York)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professors Paul Hills and Patricia Rubin



MEDIEVAL Book Launch


Thursday, 16 October 2008

17.30, Research Forum South Room


The Year 1300 and the Creation of a New European Architecture,

A. Gajewski & Z. Opacic (eds.)

Under the Influence.  The Concept of Influence and the Study of Illuminated Manuscripts,

J. Lowden & A. Bovey (eds.)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor John Lowden




Writing Art History seminar

Anonymity and Art History

Friday, 17 October 2008

14.00 - 18.00, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): David Brittain (Manchester Metropolitan University), Nick Chare (University of Reading), Althea Greenan (Women’s Art Library, Goldsmiths, University of London), Barbara Penner (Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission but please RSVP to Ingrid Guiot, Events Coordinator, at researchforum@courtauld.ac.uk by Tuesday 14 October, if possible, to enable us to organise the necessary catering

Organised by: Dr Catherine Grant

Further information: This afternoon session approaches the topic of anonymity from a wide variety of perspectives. The question posed across the session is: What impact does anonymity have on the study of an art object, an archive or architecture? Nicholas Chare will discuss the Rollright Stones in Oxfordshire, a Late Neolithic stone circle of unknown authorship. Barbara Penner will explore her research interest in anonymous public architecture, focusing on the public toilet. As part of her presentation she will screen a rarely seen Peter Greenaway film, 26 Bathrooms (1985). Althea Greenan will explore the archive at the Women’s Art Library, Goldsmiths College, focusing on issues arising from the library’s collection of semi-anonymous artist slides. David Brittain will finish the afternoon with a discussion of the absent co-author via the visual literature that Eduardo Paolozzi produced for the magazine, Ambit (1967-78).

This session is part of the Research Forum’s Writing Art History seminar group. For more information please see Writing Art History

View Abstracts and Biographies



Modern and Contemporary

After Hiroshima Mon Amour

Monday, 20 October 2008

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Silvia Kolbowski (artist)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Mignon Nixon

Further information: After Hiroshima Mon Amour is a 22 minute video/film based on the celebrated 1959 film Hiroshima Mon Amour, directed by Alain Resnais and written by Marguerite Duras. Kolbowski's After Hiroshima Mon Amour is intended as both homage and update, through the relocation to new sites of incursion and neglect - Iraq and New Orleans - and the displacement of the allegorical couple of the 1959 film onto ten actors who blur the categories of ethnicity, race, and gender in the original film. The video faithfully recreates various scenes from the original film, as well as adding contemporary material taken from the internet, and a remix of the score and sound design of the original.

Silvia Kolbowski is an artist based in New York. Her scope of address includes the ethics and politics of history, memory, sexuality, and the unconscious. Her project Proximity to Power, American Style, a slide/audio work about the relational aspects of masculine power, was part of a one-person, three-project exhibition, inadequate…Like…Power, at the Secession, Vienna, in 2004. Proximity to Power, has just been published in book form by WhiteWalls and University of Chicago Press. In 2007 she exhibited a revised version of her 1999 an inadequate history of conceptual art at the Center for Contemporary Art in Warsaw. Her most recent project, a video and photo work entitled After Hiroshima Mon Amour (2008), opened in September as a one-person exhibition at LAX<>Art in Los Angeles, curated by Christopher Bedford. She is on the advisory board of October journal, and teaches in the CCC programme of the Ecole Supérieure d’Art Visuel, Geneva.

This film screening and discussion has been made possible with the support of The Centre for Contemporary Art, University College London



London seminar for Early Modern Visual Culture

Ribera’s Five Senses and the Perceptions of Violence

Monday, 20 October 2008

18.00, Seminar Room 1

Speaker(s): Edward Payne (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Mechthild Fend (m.fend@ucl.ac.uk) and Satish Padiyar (satish.padiyar@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: This seminar series has been organised jointly by the Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum and University College London.



Research Forum Visiting Conservator programme

Gauguin at the Metropolitan: Revelations through Technical Examination

Thursday, 23 October 2008

17.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Charlotte Hale (Conservator, Sherman Fairchild Paintings Conservation Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Aviva Burnstock

Further information: This lecture brings together the findings of the technical examination of Gauguin’s paintings in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It focuses on four paintings whose authorship has, at different times, been questioned: an autograph oil on paper with a complex technical history; a work that had been de-attributed but has now been given back to the artist, based on technical study and conservation treatment; a work that had been considered as autograph but is actually by a military officer who befriended the artist during his first stay in Tahiti; and what passed as an autograph work for decades but now appears to be an outright forgery. This research has been informed by technical studies of paintings by Gauguin, including those in the Courtauld Collection, as well as study of his letters, over the last twenty-five years.

Following a degree in Art History at University College London, Charlotte Hale received her conservation education at the Courtauld Institute of Art, in its previous home at Portman Square. She went on to an internship at the National Gallery, Washington, and a fellowship in the Sherman Fairchild Paintings Conservation Center of the Metropolitan Museum of Art under John Brealey. In 1987 Charlotte Hale joined the staff at the Metropolitan. She works on paintings spanning the collection of the Museum and has published technical articles that include: an examination of The Intercession of Christ and the Virgin, attributed to Lorenzo Monaco, for The Fabric of Images, a book on early paintings on canvas edited by the late Caroline Villers; a study of the Metropolitan’s holdings of paintings by Gauguin, in the catalogue of The Lure of the Exotic: Gauguin in New York Collections and, most recently, an article on the dating of Velázquez’s The Supper at Emmaus. She has regularly taught classes in courses for Art History and Conservation students at the Institute of Fine Arts of New York University, and has given gallery talks and presentations on the materials and techniques of paintings to patrons, interns, volunteers and museum visitors.



Research Forum Visiting Conservator Programme Seminar

Infrared Examination of Paintings at The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Recent Studies

Monday, 27 October 2008

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Charlotte Hale (Conservator, Sherman Fairchild Paintings Conservation Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Aviva Burnstock

Further information: This seminar centres on Italian paintings (1300-1520) by Duccio, Fra Angelico, Raphael, Granacci and Titian that have been examined in the last few years at the Metropolitan, and presents their underdrawings, revealed using the analytical technique of infrared reflectography. The Metropolitan’s four paintings by Granacci will be discussed in the context of contemporary workshop practice. The session will include mention of recent improvements in infrared imaging using near-infrared optimized lenses and band-pass filters.

Following a degree in Art History at University College London, Charlotte Hale received her conservation education at the Courtauld Institute of Art, in its previous home at Portman Square. She went on to an internship at the National Gallery, Washington, and a fellowship in the Sherman Fairchild Paintings Conservation Center of the Metropolitan Museum of Art under John Brealey. In 1987 Charlotte Hale joined the staff at the Metropolitan. She works on paintings spanning the collection of the Museum and has published technical articles that include: an examination of The Intercession of Christ and the Virgin, attributed to Lorenzo Monaco, for The Fabric of Images, a book on early paintings on canvas edited by the late Caroline Villers; a study of the Metropolitan’s holdings of paintings by Gauguin, in the catalogue of The Lure of the Exotic: Gauguin in New York Collections and, most recently, an article on the dating of Velázquez’s The Supper at Emmaus. She has regularly taught classes in courses for Art History and Conservation students at the Institute of Fine Arts of New York University, and has given gallery talks and presentations on the materials and techniques of paintings to patrons, interns, volunteers and museum visitors.



Frank Davis Memorial Lecture Series

Writing Art History: Off the Page: Slitting Open the Kantian Eye

Tuesday, 28 October 2008

17.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Dr Charlie Gere (Reader in New Media Research and Director of the Institute for Cultural Research, Lancaster University)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Judith Batalion

Further information: This paper will consider whether art history and the museum, at least as they are currently conceived, can survive the mutations and transformations being brought about in so many areas of discourse by new information communication technologies. Art history as an academic discipline and the museum as an institution are both to some extent products of the enlightenment and, in particular, the ideas of Kant concerning aesthetic judgment. Following the work of sociologist Kevin Hetherington, Gere suggests that the connoisseurship that underpinned both traditional art history and the traditional museum was predicated on the disinterested Kantian eye that interiorises the heterogeneity of the world and treats it in terms of sense impressions, which in turn are ordered and disciplined, and which allows judgements about beauty to be made that can be deemed universal and communicated to an aesthetic community. In such a manner the Kantian gaze disavows the heterogeneity of things in favour of ordered narratives and displays within a geometric Euclidean space that in turn acts upon and disciplines the observer. Hetherington suggests that the ordered space of the modern museum (and by extension that of art history) was profoundly disrupted by avant-garde interventions, such as Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain, in which heterogeneity is reintroduced into the museum space by the inclusion of a profoundly incongruous object that could not be assimilated by the disinterested Kantian gaze. Alluding to Dali and Bunuel’s famous scene in Un Chien Andalou, Hetherington describes the avant garde ‘slitting open of the Kantian eye’. The avant-garde preoccupation with heterogeneity, incongruity and juxtaposition prefigures not just much contemporary theory, but also (far from coincidentally) the kinds of knowledge and representations made possible by new technologies and media such as the World Wide Web. That said, such media go beyond the disruption by the avant garde of the formal spaces of the museum and of art history and offer new experiences of objects and art works. In particular, by virtue of its ubiquity, its interconnectivity and its digitality, the Web offers what Norman Bryson describes as an ‘expanded field for the gaze’ in which heterogeneous objects and the subjects by which they are observed exist solely in relations of difference and alterity. The question then becomes what kind of art history and what kinds of museum organisation are possible in such a situation.

Charlie Gere is Head of Department and Reader in New Media Research in the Institute for Cultural Research, Lancaster University, Chair of Computers and the History of Art (CHArt), and was the Director of Computer Arts, Contexts, Histories, etc… (CACHe), a three-year research project looking at the history of early British computer art. He is the author of Digital Culture (Reaktion Books, 2002), and Art, Time and Technology (Berg, 2006) and co-editor of White Heat Cold Technology (MIT Press, forthcoming), as well as many papers on questions of technology, media and art. In 2007 he co-curated FEEDBACK, a major exhibition of responsive art in Gijon, Spain.

The 2008 Frank Davis Memorial Lecture Series (sponsored by F M Kirby Foundation) continues the Research Forum's examination of 'Writing Art History', exploring various ways of constructing art historical narratives, and the changing roles of art historians, critics and writers. The theme for this autumn's lectures is 'Off the Page', and the series will feature an exciting range of speakers who have themselves made art history through performance, exhibitions, the internet, and television.



Research Forum Visiting Conservator Programme Seminar

Recent Examinations and Treatments of Paintings at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Wednesday, 29 October 2008

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Charlotte Hale (Conservator, Sherman Fairchild Paintings Conservation Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Aviva Burnstock

Further information: A broad range of paintings and issues in their conservation treatments will be presented at this seminar. These include:

Fra Angelico, Madonna and Child with Angels (Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam), a very early painting by the artist, that was examined and conserved at the Metropolitan Museum at the time of the Fra Angelico exhibition in 2005.

Lucas Cranach the Elder, Judith with the Head of Holifernes: This painting on panel was badly damaged in the past through separation and poor realignment of its component boards and subsequent shaving down of paint surface to level the support. Treatment involved extensive panel work, and reconstruction with reference to variants by the artist.

Moroni, Bartolommeo Bonghi: The portrait, painted ca. 1553-63, had an inscription and a coat of arms that were added to the painting after the artist's death that significantly altered the painting's composition. The decision to remove them, made jointly by the conservation and curatorial departments, was based on careful consideration of aesthetic, historical, and technical issues.

Velázquez, The Supper at Emmaus: In conjunction with its conservation treatment for the 1988 monographic exhibition at the Metropolitan and the Prado, the varied dating of this work – from 1618 to 1632 – was addressed through technical examination, in the context of technical studies of the artist of the last twenty years.

Courbet, Les Demoiselles du Village: This great early work was treated recently in preparation for the Courbet exhibition at the Metropolitan. Technical examination elucidated the relationship of the painting with the Leeds sketch of the subject, and the nature of granular inclusions ubiquitous in the artist’s work.

Degas, The Rehearsal, (Frick Collection): The Rehearsal is one of several paintings depicting dancers in a rehearsal room at the Paris Opéra (though painted after the building had been destroyed by fire) composed from early studies and reworkings of figure groups. The genesis of the Frick picture, revealed through technical analysis, shows increasingly bold distortions to create a more daring composition.

Following a degree in Art History at University College London, Charlotte Hale received her conservation education at the Courtauld Institute of Art, in its previous home at Portman Square. She went on to an internship at the National Gallery, Washington, and a fellowship in the Sherman Fairchild Paintings Conservation Center of the Metropolitan Museum of Art under John Brealey. In 1987 Charlotte Hale joined the staff at the Metropolitan. She works on paintings spanning the collection of the Museum and has published technical articles that include: an examination of The Intercession of Christ and the Virgin, attributed to Lorenzo Monaco, for The Fabric of Images, a book on early paintings on canvas edited by the late Caroline Villers; a study of the Metropolitan’s holdings of paintings by Gauguin, in the catalogue of The Lure of the Exotic: Gauguin in New York Collections and, most recently, an article on the dating of Velázquez’s The Supper at Emmaus. She has regularly taught classes in courses for Art History and Conservation students at the Institute of Fine Arts of New York University, and has given gallery talks and presentations on the materials and techniques of paintings to patrons, interns, volunteers and museum visitors.



Research seminar: History of Photography

Chinese Contemporary Photography: Art History Incorporated

Wednesday, 29 October 2008

17.30, Seminar Room 4

Speaker(s): Dr Juliet Hacking (Programme Director, MA in Photography, Sotheby’s Institute)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Barbara Thompson and Alexandra Moschovi

Further information: The History of Photography research seminar series aims to be a discursive platform for the discussion and dissemination of current research on photography.  From art as photography and early photographic technology to ethnographic photographs and contemporary photography as art, the seminar welcomes contributions from researchers across the board, whether independent or affiliated with museums, galleries, archives, libraries or higher education, and endeavours to provide scholars with a challenging opportunity to present work in progress and test out new ideas.

The seminars usually take place once a term, on Wednesday evenings at 5.30pm in the Research Forum. The papers, and formal discussion, are followed by informal discussion over a glass of wine.

Contact: Dr Alexandra Moschovi (alexandra.moschovi@courtauld.ac.uk) or Barbara Thompson (barbara.thompson@courtauld.ac.uk)



Research seminar: Modern and Contemporary

‘Composed of the Same Materials’: Like-Dressing and the Doppelgänger’s Dress in Victorian Art and Fiction

Monday, 3 November 2008

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Anna Kirk (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Caroline Arscott



RESEARCH SEMINAR: RENAISSANCE
Claus Sluter's Well of Moses Reconsidered: the Magdalene, the Carthusians, Jeremiah and Philip the Bold


Tuesday, 4 November 2008

18.00, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr Susie Nash (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Georgia Clarke

Further information: This lecture continues on from and completes the research first presented at The Courtauld in a lecture in Autumn 2005.





ICMA at the Courtauld lecture series 2008-9

The Sachsenspiegel Picture Books: Working to Put Women and Jews "in their Place"

Thursday, 6 November 2008

17.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Madeleine Caviness (Mary Richardson Professor Emeritus, Tufts University)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Joanna Cannon

Further information: This lecture is presented by the Courtauld Institute of Art in association with the International Center of Medieval Art, New York, and with the support of the Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum. The International Center of Medieval Art promotes the study of the visual arts of the Middle Ages in Europe.  Its worldwide membership includes academics, museum professionals, students, and other enthusiasts. The lecture series ICMA at the Courtauld is made possible through the generosity of Dr. William M. Voelkle.

The lecture will be followed by a reception sponsored by Sam Fogg.

ICMA publishes a scholarly journal Gesta, a newsletter, and sponsors lectures and conference sessions. Contact ICMA@medievalart.org or see the website http://www.medievalart.org

Annual membership application forms for ICMA will be available at the lecture: Students $20 Others $60

Local arrangements: Dr Joanna Cannon, Courtauld Institute of Art, joanna.cannon@courtauld.ac.uk.



London Renaissance Consortium

The Victoria & Albert Museum's Medieval and Renaissance Gallery Project: A Student Study Day

Friday, 7 November 2008

10.30 - 17.00 (Note: times subject to change as speakers are confirmed)

Loggia Seminar Room, Victoria & Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 2RL

Ticket/entry details: Free of charge but space is limited. Please contact Maya Oppenheimer at mayarae.oppenheimer@network.rca.ac.uk to be added to the attendance list or for questions surrounding this event.

Further information: A day-long investigation and discussion of the V&A's new permanent galleries, including seminars led by gallery professionals, object-handling sessions and open discussions surrounding museum, research and exhibition issues. Speakers have been invited from various departments within the V&A and will speak about their roles in the gallery development project. Led by gallery professionals, this day is designed for postgraduate students.
Any queries, please contact Maya Oppenheimer at mayarae.oppenheimer@network.rca.ac.uk. A detailed schedule will be provided to all participants closer to the date.




Frank Davis Memorial Lecture Series

Writing Art History: Off the Page: Performing Art History

Tuesday, 11 November 2008

17.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Andrea Fraser (Associate Professor, Department of Art, UCLA; and faculty, Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Judith Batalion

Further information: Andrea Fraser will discuss her work and its relationship to the institution of art history.

She is an artist whose work has been identified with performance, context art, and institutional critique. The Kunstverein in Hamburg produced a 20-year retrospective of her work in 2003. Her recent books include Andrea Fraser: Works 1985-2003, available from DuMont, and Museum Highlights: The Writings of Andrea Fraser, edited by Alexander Alberro and with a foreword by Pierre Bourdieu, released by MIT Press in 2005. She is currently on the faculty of the Whitney Independent Study Program and Associate Professor in the Department of Art, University of California, Los Angeles.

The 2008 Frank Davis Memorial Lecture Series (sponsored by F M Kirby Foundation) continues the Research Forum's examination of 'Writing Art History', exploring various ways of constructing art historical narratives, and the changing roles of art historians, critics and writers. The theme for this autumn's lectures is 'Off the Page', and the series will feature an exciting range of speakers who have themselves made art history through performance, exhibitions, the internet, and television.



Conference

‘The World Turned Inside Out’: Bronze Casting in the 20th Century


Louise Bourgeois JANUS FLEURI, 1968 Bronze, gold patina, hanging piece 25.7 x 31.7 x 21.2 cm.Courtesy Cheim & Read, Galerie Karsten Greve, and Galerie Hauser & Wirth Photo: Christopher Burk


Saturday, 15 November 2008

10.00 - 18.15, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre (with registration from 09.30)

Speaker(s): James Boaden (Courtauld Institute of Art and Centre for the Study of Surrealism and Its Legacies, University of Manchester), William Cobbing (Central St Martins), Sam Dalton (Crucible Foundry), Romolo Del Deo (artist, New York), Juliet Haysom (artist), Rungwe Kingdon (Pangolin Foundry), Antoinette Le Normand-Romain (Institut national d’histoire de l’art (INHA), Paris), Jed Morse (Nasher Center, Dallas), Mignon Nixon (Courtauld Institute of Art), Derek Pullen (Tate), Amélie Simier (Petit Palais, Paris), Sarah Wilson (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: £15 (£10 concessions; free for Courtauld students) Please send a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Co-ordinator, Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, clearly stating that you wish to book for the ‘Bronze Casting in the 20th Century conference’. For credit card bookings call 020 7848 2785/2909. For further information, send an e-mail to ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by: Dr Alexandra Gerstein and Professor Mignon Nixon

Further information:

For the world to lose its meaning, it is enough to turn it inside-out like a glove, to invert the full and the empty. (Yve-Alain Bois, Formless: A User’s Guide)

For the uninitiated, casting can be a confounding process. This symposium will bring together artists, art historians, curators, conservators, and founders to discuss the technical and imaginative demands of an indirect process of making, and to consider the historical persistence of a material distinctive for its metamorphic possibilities.

The event will explore the diverse ways in which sculptors from the early twentieth century to the present day have responded to the material, technical, creative, and commercial requirements of bronze casting. It will consider such questions as: the symbolic and cultural significance of the medium of bronze; the changing relationship between artists and foundries from the time of Rodin to an era of artistic de-skilling; the division of art and artisanship, conception and making in contemporary art; the economy of casting and the globalisation of the foundry industry; artistic training and the shift from apprenticeship and medium-based pedagogic cultures to ‘art in general’; recent theoretical and critical reflections on the casting process, in particular concepts of indexicality and entropy; and the material, social, and psychic economies of casting. The symposium will conclude with a round table discussion on bronze casting today.

View programme [PDF]
View abstracts [PDF]

This conference has been organised in collaboration with the Institut national d’histoire de l’art (INHA), Paris, and a second day will be held on 17 December 2008 at the Musée Rodin in Paris.

We gratefully acknowledge the generous support of the Henry Moore Foundation and of the Institut national d’histoire de l’art

 

 

Henry Moore logo



Research seminar: Modern and Contemporary

Performing Objectively: Thomas Ruff and Francis Galton

Monday, 17 November 2008

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Ben Burbridge (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Caroline Arscott




Frank Davis Memorial Lecture Series

Writing Art History: Off the Page: Looking at Faces: Re-viewing Joshua Reynolds' The Marlborough Family (1777-9)

Tuesday, 18 November 2008

17.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Professor Mark Hallett (Department of History of Art, University of York)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Judith Batalion

Further information: This lecture offers a fresh reading of Sir Joshua Reynolds's celebrated portrait of the Marlborough Family (1777-9), in which Professor Hallett interprets the painting in relation to the themes of dynasty, connoisseurship, parental tenderness, childhood and intimacy, and as an ambitious assemblage of interacting pictorial elements. The lecture is designed to suggest new, historically informed ways of approaching and interpreting Reynolds's own work, and hopes to indicate the interpretative richness of the Georgian family portrait as a pictorial genre. It also makes a case for the benefits that continue to accrue from the practice and skill of looking in a concentrated, questioning and patient way at a single work of art.

Mark Hallett is Professor of History of Art at the University of York. He is the author of The Spectacle of Difference: Graphic Satire in the Age of Hogarth (New Haven and London, 1999) and Hogarth (London, 2000). He co-curated the Tate Britain exhibition Hogarth in 2007 and was the associate curator for the 2005 Tate Britain exhibition Joshua Reynolds: The Creation of Celebrity. He is currently completing a monograph on Reynolds's portraiture.

The 2008 Frank Davis Memorial Lecture Series (sponsored by F M Kirby Foundation) continues the Research Forum's examination of 'Writing Art History', exploring various ways of constructing art historical narratives, and the changing roles of art historians, critics and writers. The theme for this autumn's lectures is 'Off the Page', and the series will feature an exciting range of speakers who have themselves made art history through performance, exhibitions, the internet, and television.



Research seminar: History of Photography

Celebrity Photography since the Kuroi

Wednesday, 19 November 2008
17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr. Richard Howells (Reader in Cultural and Creative Industries, Director of Centre for Cultural, Media and Creative Industries Research, King’s College, London)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Barbara Thompson and Alexandra Moschovi

Further information: The History of Photography research seminar series aims to be a discursive platform for the discussion and dissemination of current research on photography. From art as photography and early photographic technology to ethnographic photographs and contemporary photography as art, the seminar welcomes contributions from researchers across the board, whether independent or affiliated with museums, galleries, archives, libraries or higher education, and endeavours to provide scholars with a challenging opportunity to present work in progress and test out new ideas.

The seminars usually take place once a term, on Wednesday evenings at 5.30pm in the Research Forum. The papers, and formal discussion, are followed by informal discussion over a glass of wine.

Contact: Dr Alexandra Moschovi (alexandra.moschovi@courtauld.ac.uk) or Barbara Thompson (barbara.thompson@courtauld.ac.uk)



Research seminar: Medieval Work in Progress

Adventitious Images in Medieval English Manuscripts

Thursday, 20 November 2008

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Julian Luxford (University of St Andrews)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor John Lowden



London seminar for Early Modern Visual Culture

The Imaginary Black: Visual Practices in Eighteenth-Century France

Monday, 24 November 2008

18.00, Seminar Room 1

Speaker(s): Anne Lafont (Institut national d’histoire de l’art (INHA), Paris)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Mechthild Fend (m.fend@ucl.ac.uk) and Satish Padiyar (satish.padiyar@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: This seminar series has been organised jointly by the Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum and University College London.



Frank Davis Memorial Lecture Series

Writing Art History: Off the Page: Broadcasting Medieval Culture

Tuesday, 25 November 2008

17.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Dr Alixe Bovey (School of History, University of Kent)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Judith Batalion

Further information: Drawing on her recent experience presenting the BBC4 series In Search of Medieval Britain, Alixe Bovey's lecture explores the risks and benefits of television as a medium for the history (visual and otherwise) of the Middle Ages. Setting the series within the context of BBC4's 'Medieval Season' and taking a longer view of other medieval documentaries, the lecture reflects on the challenges and opportunities the small-screen presents for medieval history.

Alixe Bovey is a specialist in medieval art history, and is Lecturer in Medieval History at the University of Kent. Her research focuses on pictorial narrative in Gothic manuscripts. She received her MA and PhD from the Courtauld Institute of Art, and was a curator of manuscripts at the British Library before taking up her post at Kent. In spring 2008, she presented the six-part series In Search of Medieval Britain as part of the ‘Medieval Season’ screened on BBC4.

The 2008 Frank Davis Memorial Lecture Series (sponsored by F M Kirby Foundation) continues the Research Forum's examination of 'Writing Art History', exploring various ways of constructing art historical narratives, and the changing roles of art historians, critics and writers. The theme for this autumn's lectures is 'Off the Page', and the series will feature an exciting range of speakers who have themselves made art history through performance, exhibitions, the internet, and television.



Conference

'Mal'occhio': Looking Awry at the Renaissance

Ugo da Carpi, Diogenes, seated in front of his barrel (detail), a woodcut after Parmigianino
© Trustees of the British Museum


Saturday, 29 November 2008

09.30 - 18.15, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre (with registration from 09.00)

Speaker(s): Jill Burke (University of Edinburgh), Christopher Heuer (Princeton University), Robert Maniura (Birkbeck College, University of London), Alex Nagel (Institute of Fine Arts, New York University), Alina Payne (Harvard University and Max Planck Institute, Rome), Ulrich Pfisterer (Ludwig-Maximilians Universität, Munich), Francisco Prado-Vilar (Universidad Complutense, Madrid), Rebecca Zorach (University of Chicago)

Ticket/entry details: £15 (£10 concessions). Please send a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Co-ordinator, Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, clearly stating that you wish to book for the ‘Mal’Occhio: Looking Awry at the Renaissance conference’. For credit card bookings call 020 7848 2785/2909. For further information, send an e-mail to ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by: Patricia Rubin (Courtauld) and Maria Loh (UCL) in collaboration with the Oxford Art Journal

Further information: In art history, the Vasarian paradigm of perfection has dominated the study of the centuries grouped under the concept of rinascita, or, since the nineteenth century, the period term Renaissance. The idealising view of the Renaissance has been challenged by scholars working in the wake of writers such as Aby Warburg and Michel Foucault and this conference aims to continue questioning the humanist construct of the “civilisation of the Renaissance”. It will do so in part by examining alternative temporalities – models of time (anachronism, archaism, Nachleben) that disrupt familiar categorisations. It will consider what is at stake in the “Renaissance” as a period label and how it has been positioned against the “Early Modern”: should modernity be unmasked? Looking at the overlooked, the in-between, and the repressed, the papers presented will consider the discrepancies, disjunctions, and interferences that disrupt master narratives and destabilise comforting perspectives on specific artists or works of art. Reflecting upon concepts of time, space, and memory in the material histories of the period, some of the issues to be addressed include: What use can we make of period labels? Are certain materials still excluded from the culture of the Renaissance? How can we rethink artistic experience within the spatio-temporal reconfiguration of the “Old” World and “New” World? Have new hierarchies been instituted in the study of “Renaissance” art? If so what are they and what critical paths can we take?

This conference organised in collaboration with the Oxford Art Journal will result in a special issue of the Journal.

View programme [PDF]
View abstracts [PDF]

We acknowledge the generous support of:

 




Modern and Contemporary

Decline and Fall?: Representing the Sporting Body in Late-Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia

Monday, 1 December 2008

12.30 - 14.00, Seminar Room 1

Speaker(s): Dr Mike O’Mahony (University of Bristol)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Sarah Wilson
Further information: This paper will focus predominantly on a comparison of two key works, both representing Soviet gymnastics: Dmitrii Zhilinskii’s Gymnasts of the USSR, a painting produced in 1965, and Grisha Bruskin’s sculptural work entitled Athlete (from the series Archaeologists’ Collection), produced in 2003. Produced fully forty years apart, these two works provide fascinating case studies to consider how developments within sport as a form of socio-cultural practice, informed by nationalist, political and ideological concerns, were articulated in visual culture both in the late- and post-Soviet eras. Here, what connects both works is a sense of ambiguity. For example, Zhilinskii’s work, initially promoted as an officially sanctioned work celebrating Soviet sport, can simultaneously be read as a critique of the Soviet Union’s adoption of international sport as a weapon in the Cold War. In the aftermath of the Second World War the Soviet authorities had explicitly claimed that victories on the sports fields of the world provided ‘irrefutable proof of the superiority of socialist culture over the decaying culture of the capitalist states’ and frequently deployed extreme measures to ensure the ‘production’ of top class athletes. On the other hand, Bruskin’s work seems most obviously to celebrate the demise of the Soviet system, here symbolised by a fragmented relic of a past, and now defunct, era. Yet, might it also be possible to identify here a sense of loss, a nostalgia for past glories in the same way that the recovery of fragmented monuments from Ancient Greece and Rome were celebrated as a revival of glorious epochs now lost to history?

The key questions posed by this paper will be:

- How might such examples of visual culture offer insights into sport practices and the reception of sport in the 1960s and 2000s?

- What do these works tell us about the sports theme in Soviet and post-Soviet art?

- To what extent might these works be read as celebrations and/or condemnations of the Soviet Union’s official deployment of sport?

- How might an analysis of these works contribute to our understanding of contemporary attitudes to Soviet sport in a post-Soviet age?

Mike O'Mahony is Senior Lecturer in the History of Art department at the University of Bristol. He is a specialist in Soviet art and cinema and the author of Sport in the USSR: Physical Culture - Visual Culture, London, 2006 and Sergei Eisenstein (Critical Lives), London, 2008. He has also published a number of articles on Soviet sculpture and the Moscow Metro.



Research seminar: Modern and Contemporary

Mapping the Routes of Cultural Exchange between Russia and Germany in the 1920s

Monday, 1 December 2008
17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Maria Mileeva (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Caroline Arscott



London seminar for Early Modern Visual Culture

Passionate Angles

Monday, 1 December 2008

18.00, Seminar Room 1

Speaker(s): Rebecca Zorach (University of Chicago)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Mechthild Fend (m.fend@ucl.ac.uk) and Satish Padiyar (satish.padiyar@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: This seminar series has been organised jointly by the Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum and University College London.



Research seminar: Medieval Work in Progress

Constructing the Past: the Royal Chapels of Toledo Cathedral

Thursday, 4 December 2008

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Thomas Nickson (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor John Lowden



International Advisory Board Seminar

Renaissance Faces: Van Eyck to Titian

Monday, 8 December 2008

11.30 - 13.00, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Susan Foister (National Gallery, London), Philippe Bordes (Institut national d'histoire de l'art (INHA), Paris), Alessandro Nova (Kunsthistorisches Institut/ Max-Planck Gesellschaft, Florence)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Patricia Rubin

Further information: Renaissance Faces is a spectacular gathering of images that makes an important contribution to current debates about portrayal in fifteenth and sixteenth century Europe. Chaired by Joanna Woodall, a specialist in the field, this seminar brings together Susan Foister, the lead curator of the London exhibition, with leading international scholars in the Renaissance and Early Modern periods to explore issues raised by the show. What are the arguments made by the exhibition, and how do scholars from different periods and with different kinds of expertise respond to them? What are the implications of the title Renaissance Faces, and how does the exhibition engage with the shifting relationship between the ‘exterior’ and the ‘interior’ that defines the period as ‘Early Modern’?



London seminar for Early Modern Visual Culture

Painting as an Act: Some Problems in ‘Agency and Art’

Monday, 8 December 2008 CANCELLED

18.00, Seminar Room 1

Speaker(s): Satish Padiyar (Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Mechthild Fend (m.fend@ucl.ac.uk) and Satish Padiyar (satish.padiyar@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: This seminar series has been organised jointly by the Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum and University College London.



International Advisory Board Seminar

Reenactment

Tuesday, 9 December 2008

14.30 - 16.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): David Joselit (Professor and Chair, History of Art Department, Yale University)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Mignon Nixon
Further information:
The power of images, in both the realms of art and politics, derives as much from their re-enactment — their wide circulation in diverse locations — as it does from their ostensible content or form.  This lecture will offer a description of how such power operates through an integrated discussion of recent video and sculptural installations by the artists Catherine Sullivan and Mike Kelley, as well as various image tactics in the recent American election.


Recommended readings:

- Hannah Arendt, "On Violence," in Crises of the Republic (San Diego: Harcourt Brace & Company, 1972), pp. 103-183

And the interviews in:

- Catherine Sullivan (Vienna: Secession, 2005)

- Catherine Sullivan: FIVE ECONOMIES (big hunt/little hunt) (Los Angeles: UCLA Hammer Museum; Chicago: The Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago, 2002).

David Joselit worked as a curator at The Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston from 1983-1989 where he co-organised several exhibitions including: DISSENT: The Issue of Modern Art in Boston (1985), Endgame: Reference and Simulation in Recent Painting and Sculpture (1986) and The British Edge (1987). After receiving his Ph.D. in Art History from Harvard in 1995, he began teaching in the Department of Art History and Ph.D. Program in Visual Studies at the University of California, Irvine, where he taught until 2003. He is currently Professor and Chair of the History of Art Department at Yale. Joselit is author of Infinite Regress: Marcel Duchamp 1910-1941 (MIT Press, 1998), American Art Since 1945 (Thames and Hudson, World of Art Series, 2003), and Feedback: Television Against Democracy (MIT Press, 2007). He writes regularly on contemporary art and culture for such publications as OCTOBER and Artforum.