APRIL

RESEARCH SEMINAR: MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY

Picassopoetics

Monday, 27 April 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Charles F B Miller (Research Forum/Mellon Foundation MA Postdoctoral Fellow, The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Caroline Arscott



RESEARCH forum visiting conservator programme lecture

 

Colour Change in Van Gogh’s French Paintings

Tuesday, 28 April 2009

17.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Detail from 'Courtesan: after Eisen' by Van Gogh, with stach of similar coloured yarn(Left) Detail from Courtesan: after Eisen, October-November 1887, by Vincent van Gogh. (Right) Similar colour combinations in one of the balls of wool kept by the artist in a red lacquer box in his Paris studio. Collection Vincent van Gogh Museum (Vincent van Gogh Foundation) Amsterdam.Speaker(s): Dr Ella Hendriks (Head of Conservation, van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Aviva Burnstock

Further information: Recent investigation of Van Gogh’s French paintings in the Van Gogh Museum collection has turned up repeated evidence for colour change as a consequence of the artist using poor quality tube colours that have deteriorated over time. This phenomenon will be discussed within the context of the artist’s own theoretical understanding and practical usage of colour in the period. Van Gogh’s letters reveal that, as for other painters of his day, he was aware of the fugitive nature of certain pigments, suggesting prior measures to compensate for change. Examples drawn from the Van Gogh Museum collection will illustrate the significant impact that colour change can have upon our current judgment of style. In the recent past, this in turn has contributed towards incorrect dating or even misattribution of individual works. Though colour change cannot be reversed in paintings, nowadays we can turn to modern colour science techniques that enable us to rejuvenate discoloured paint areas in a digital image, helping to visualize how the affected paintings may have looked when they were made. Related conservation issues will also be considered, such as the consequence of mismatched retouches, solvent sensitivity of deteriorated colour areas, and the need to accurately document and monitor colour change, as well as to determine safe conditions of lighting and display.

Dr Ella Hendriks has an art historical background, completing her undergraduate studies in Art History at the University of Manchester in 1982, and in 2006 gaining a PhD at the Faculty of Art History, University of Amsterdam for her joint thesis entitled New views on Van Gogh’s development in Antwerp and Paris: an integrated technical and art historical study of his paintings in the Van Gogh Museum. In 1986 she completed her training as a conservator of easel paintings at the Hamilton Kerr Institute, University of Cambridge. Afterwards she settled in Holland, where from 1988 to 1999 she was Head Conservator at the Frans Halsmuseum in Haarlem, working and publishing widely on the outstanding collection of paintings by sixteenth to seventeenth century Haarlem masters. Since 1999 she is Head of Conservation at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam where she is in charge of the programme of conservation and research of paintings by Vincent van Gogh and his contemporaries. In recent years she has coauthored the forthcoming new catalogue of Antwerp and Paris works by Van Gogh (1885-1888), acted as Coordinating Principal Investigator for the project Materials and Techniques of Van Gogh within the De Mayerne Research Programme (2001-2005), and collaborated with image processors to develop new tools in support of art historical and technical investigation of paintings. Over the past five years she has co-supervised several Final Year Diploma Thesis projects relating to the Van Gogh Museum collection, conducted by students from The Courtauld’s conservation training programme. The lectures and seminars to be presented whilst Research Forum Visiting Conservator will reflect the outcome of all these activities.



RESEARCH FORUM VISITING CONSERVATOR PROGRAMME SEMINAR

Computer-assisted Examination of Van Gogh’s Canvases

Wednesday, 29 April 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr Ella Hendriks (Head of Conservation, van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Aviva Burnstock

Further information: A recent interdisciplinary effort has led to the development of new tools for the computer-assisted examination of canvas weave from x-ray images of paintings. The use of these tools for documentation and research purposes will be demonstrated and evaluated against traditional methods of hand thread counting and visual examination of x-rays, in the light of case studies drawn from the Van Gogh collection. Each example to be discussed will pose different questions relating to Van Gogh’s working practice, or to the dating and attribution of his works. For example, semi-automated mapping of weave density across a canvas now enables us to detect bands of slight variation that run across from one picture support to the next, providing compelling evidence to link them up as being cut from the same roll (even without ground sampling and analysis). This is especially helpful to reconstruct the sequence of Van Gogh’s late French pictures, made on pieces of canvas cut from 5-10m rolls of very consistent quality ordered from the Paris firm Tasset et L’Hote.

Dr Ella Hendriks has an art historical background, completing her undergraduate studies in Art History at the University of Manchester in 1982, and in 2006 gaining a PhD at the Faculty of Art History, University of Amsterdam for her joint thesis entitled New views on Van Gogh’s development in Antwerp and Paris: an integrated technical and art historical study of his paintings in the Van Gogh Museum. In 1986 she completed her training as a conservator of easel paintings at the Hamilton Kerr Institute, University of Cambridge. Afterwards she settled in Holland, where from 1988 to 1999 she was Head Conservator at the Frans Halsmuseum in Haarlem, working and publishing widely on the outstanding collection of paintings by sixteenth to seventeenth century Haarlem masters. Since 1999 she is Head of Conservation at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam where she is in charge of the programme of conservation and research of paintings by Vincent van Gogh and his contemporaries. In recent years she has coauthored the forthcoming new catalogue of Antwerp and Paris works by Van Gogh (1885-1888), acted as Coordinating Principal Investigator for the project Materials and Techniques of Van Gogh within the De Mayerne Research Programme (2001-2005), and collaborated with image processors to develop new tools in support of art historical and technical investigation of paintings. Over the past five years she has co-supervised several Final Year Diploma Thesis projects relating to the Van Gogh Museum collection, conducted by students from The Courtauld’s conservation training programme. The lectures and seminars to be presented whilst Research Forum Visiting Conservator will reflect the outcome of all these activities.



Research seminar: MEDIEVAL WORK IN PROGRESS

Late Antique Monuments and the Construction of an Early Christian Past

Thursday, 30 April 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Sible de Blaauw (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor John Lowden



SYMPOSIUM

Cassoni

Thursday, 30 April 2009

The Courtauld Institute of Art and the Victoria and Albert Museum

Ticket/entry details: by invitation only
Organised by: Dr Caroline Campbell

Further information: This one-day symposium has been organised to coincide with the exhibition Love and Marriage in Renaissance Florence: The Courtauld Wedding Chests. It will consider the manufacture, as well as the conservation history of the cassoni and detached panels from chests belonging to The Courtauld Gallery. The morning will be spent at The Courtauld studying objects in the exhibition, and elsewhere. A visit will also be made to the Victoria and Albert Museum, to examine chests in its collection which have been the subject of recent study.

The purpose of this event is to promote object-based discussion among participants, who will include art historians and conservators, and by this means to further the study of cassoni. There will be no formal lectures as such, although some short presentations will be made.




LONDON FESTIVAL OF EUROPE

City 2009: bringing down the walls

Opening Lecture: City/Multiplicity

Thursday, 30 April 2009

17.30 - 19.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Stefano Boeri, Markus Miessen and Hans Ulrich Obrist

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Sarah Wilson in collaboration with Lorenzo Marsili (European Alternatives)

Further information: For this opening event of the London Festival of Europe and City2009, architect Stefano Boeri will talk with curator Hans Ulrich Obrist and architect Markus Miessen about his project Multiplicity, an ongoing artistic investigation into the implications of globalisation relating to the architectures, territories and temporalities of different localities in Europe.

The opening debate will focus on the question of the ‘global city’, looking particularly at the phenomena of migrations, movements, and modifications of the urban texture, and the emergence of new borders/frontiers as back-side of the globalisation process.

City2009 opens the London Festival of Europe 2009, a series of free public activities that promote imaginative engagement with the urban realities of a global city and explores the potential for transnational politics and art. For further details about the Festival please see www.festivalofeurope.eu

The opening debate will be followed by a reception





MAY


RESEARCH FORUM VISITING CONSERVATOR PROGRAMME LECTURE

Recent Findings from Technical Study of Van Gogh’s Paintings in the Van Gogh Museum Collection

Friday, 1 May 2009

17.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Sketch of frame by Van Gogh and infrared detail of his painting 'Montmartre: mills and allotments, 1887(Top) Vincent van Gogh’s sketch of his perspective frame in a letter of 5 August 1882. (Bottom) Infrared detail of Montmartre: mills and allotments painted by the artist in March-mid April 1887, revealing the traced contours of a perspective frame. Collection Vincent van Gogh Museum (Vincent van Gogh Foundation) Amsterdam.

Speaker(s): Dr Ella Hendriks (Head of Conservation, van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Aviva Burnstock

Further information: The popular Romantic notion of Van Gogh is as the genial artist working in a direct and intuitive manner, without any prior plan. Yet recent technical study of his paintings kept at the Van Gogh Museum has produced ample evidence for a more calculated approach towards the development and execution of his artistic ideas. This might, for example, entail a careful preparatory stage of underdrawing to establish the composition (using a tracing and transfer technique, or with the aid of a traditional ‘perspective frame’). Similarly, study of his Paris works has shown the artist’s conscious exploration of different combinations of picture support and paint application techniques for particular effect, including the realization of a fluent impasto facture that we now consider to be a hallmark for the artist. Illustrative examples drawn from the Van Gogh Museum collection will be discussed, at the same time considering how the appearance of some works has been changed by later, inappropriate lining and varnishing treatments.

Dr Ella Hendriks has an art historical background, completing her undergraduate studies in Art History at the University of Manchester in 1982, and in 2006 gaining a PhD at the Faculty of Art History, University of Amsterdam for her joint thesis entitled New views on Van Gogh’s development in Antwerp and Paris: an integrated technical and art historical study of his paintings in the Van Gogh Museum. In 1986 she completed her training as a conservator of easel paintings at the Hamilton Kerr Institute, University of Cambridge. Afterwards she settled in Holland, where from 1988 to 1999 she was Head Conservator at the Frans Halsmuseum in Haarlem, working and publishing widely on the outstanding collection of paintings by sixteenth to seventeenth century Haarlem masters. Since 1999 she is Head of Conservation at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam where she is in charge of the programme of conservation and research of paintings by Vincent van Gogh and his contemporaries. In recent years she has coauthored the forthcoming new catalogue of Antwerp and Paris works by Van Gogh (1885-1888), acted as Coordinating Principal Investigator for the project Materials and Techniques of Van Gogh within the De Mayerne Research Programme (2001-2005), and collaborated with image processors to develop new tools in support of art historical and technical investigation of paintings. Over the past five years she has co-supervised several Final Year Diploma Thesis projects relating to the Van Gogh Museum collection, conducted by students from The Courtauld’s conservation training programme. The lectures and seminars to be presented whilst Research Forum Visiting Conservator will reflect the outcome of all these activities.





BARBAD GOLSHIRI IN CONVERsation with Layal ftouni

"Unveiled" Unveiled: Dismantling or Reproducing the Orientalist Canon?


Wednesday, 6 May 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Barbad Golshiri (artist) and Layal Ftouni (University of Westminster)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Sarah Wilson

Further information: This seminar takes its title from the current research of Layal Ftouni, ‘Dismantling or Reproducing the Orientalist Canon? Neo-Orientalism in Visual Arts. Woman, image and representations’. In the context of Unveiled (Saatchi Gallery, London, closing 9 May 2009), where Barbad Golshiri is exhibiting, Ftouni will address the institutional desire in the Western metropolis for an aestheticised form of Oriental ‘otherness’, celebrated and consumed under the banner of multicultural pluralism. Barbad Golshiri’s presentation, The Abyss, will criticise ‘Exoticism’ as a dominant trend in the contemporary art scene, involving the aestheticisation of stereotypes and the desire for predictability in the art of a constructed region called ‘the Middle East’: an empty signifier. Golshiri will focus on the entanglement of commercially well-received Iranian artists and certain ideological apparatuses.

Barbad Golshiri works as an artist, and political and cultural critic in Teheran. His media range from video, installation, photography and documented performance to comic strip and visual poetry. He has translated Samuel Beckett into Persian. Most of his works are language-based and contend with art and literature's plane of the feasible. Recent participations include Iran, new voices, (Barbican Centre, 2008); Medium Religion, ZKM, Karlsruhe (curated by Boris Groys and Peter Weibel, moving to the Niland Gallery, County Sligo, May 2009); Unveiled, New Art from the Middle East (Saatchi Gallery, 2009) and his solo video installation Exhibition (A Twenty-one thousand, Eight hundred and Four-minute Unworsenable Aplastic), Göteborgs Konstmuseum, Sweden.  www.barbadgolshiri.com

Layal Ftouni, was born in Beirut, She is currently a Visiting Lecturer in the School of Media, Arts and Design, University of Westminster, where she teaches photography, film and feminist studies, She is preparing a chapter for Cultural Studies in the Arab World (I.B.Tauris) and a chapter for Rhetoric of the Image: Visual Culture in the Modern Middle East (Columbia University Press), both to be published in 2010.  http://www.wmin.ac.uk/mad/page-1738




CAROLINE VILLERS RESEARCH FELLOW LECTURE

Rodchenko at Work: A Technical Examination of his Paintings

Thursday, 7 May 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr Maria Kokkori (Caroline Villers Research Fellow 2008-09, The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Aviva Burnstock

Further information: This lecture focuses on the examination of Aleksandr Rodchenko’s use of materials, including pigments and binding media, changes in style and handling of materials, with reference to documented accounts of his aims and practices, as well as the influence of contemporary painters with which he associated and worked. Comparison of analytical data with written accounts, places these findings in context, whilst testing the reliability of sources. Practices, themes and attitudes are explored within the broader context of Russian constructivism.



LEONARDO DA VINCI SOCIETY ANNUAL LECTURE 2009

Light and Shadow in Vermeer

Friday, 8 May 2009

18.00 - 19.00, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Professor Philip Steadman, (Professor of Urban and Built Form Studies at University College London, and the author of Vermeer’s Camera (Oxford University Press 2001)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Frances Ames-Lewis (Birkbeck)

Further information: Lawrence Gowing wrote of Vermeer’s technique that “The description is always exactly adequate, always completely and effortlessly in terms of light. Vermeer seems almost not to care, or not even to know, what it is that he is painting. What do men call this wedge of light? A nose? A finger? What do we know of its shape? To Vermeer none of this matters, the conceptual world of names and knowledge is forgotten, nothing concerns him but what is visible, the tone, the wedge of light.”This lecture will explore Vermeer’s treatment of light and shadow in the context of his use of the camera obscura. It will examine his rendering of simple and compound shadows, inter-reflection, highlights, and above all what Kenneth Clark called Vermeer’s ‘uncannily true sense of tone’, deployed with an ‘almost inhuman detachment’. It is this truth to tonality – not any minute attention to detail – that gives the paintings the ‘photographic’ quality that has fascinated (chemical) photographers since the mid 19th century and filmmakers in the 20th. Connections will be drawn along the way to Leonardo’s analysis of the same optical phenomena.



RESEARCH SEMINAR: MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY

Landscape Paintings of Alan Reynolds

Monday, 11 May 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Fiona Gaskin (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Caroline Arscott



2009 LONDON seminar IN ROMAN ART

Reading Trajan's Column

Monday, 11 May 2009

17.30, Seminar Room 1

Speaker(s): Amanda Claridge (Royal Holloway, University of London)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Peter Stewart and Amanda Claridge



Research seminar: RENAISSANCE

Clothing the Word: Filippo Lippi, Donatello and Bellini

Wednesday, 13 May 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Professor Paul Hills (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Susie Nash



Research seminar: MEDIEVAL WORK IN PROGRESS

Performing Andria.  A Frontispiece of Terence in MS Vat.lat.3305

Thursday, 14 May 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Beatrice Keefe (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor John Lowden



Study Day

Music and Modernism

14.45 - 18.30, Friday, 15 May 2009 (with registration from 14.15)

10.00 - 18.00, Saturday 16 May 2009 (with registration from 09.30)

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Michael Berkowitz (University College, London), Corrinne Chong (University of Edinburgh), Malcolm Cook (Birkbeck College, University of London), John Deathridge (King’s College London), Michelle Foa (Tulane University), Ayla Lepine (The Courtauld Institute of Art), James Mansell (University of Manchester), Jody Patterson (Smithsonian American Art Museum), James Rubin (State University of New York), Simon Shaw-Miller (Birkbeck College, University of London), Diane Silverthorne (Birkbeck College, University of London, and the Royal College of Art, London), Petritakis Spyridon (University of Crete), Douglas Stevens (University of Bristol), Olga Touloumi (Harvard University), Professor Peter Vergo (University of Essex),. Melissa Warak (University of Texas at Austin), Robert Williams (University of California, Santa Barbara) and Isabel Wünsche (Jacobs University, Bremen)

Ticket/entry details: £25 (£15 students, Courtauld staff and RMA members) Please send a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Co-ordinator, Research Forum, The Courtauld Institute of Art , Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, clearly stating that you wish to book for the ‘Music and Modernism study day’. For credit card bookings call 020 7848 2785/2909. For further information, send an e-mail to ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by: Charlotte de Mille

Further information: Exploring Kandinsky’s contention that the ‘various arts are drawing together […] finding in music the best teacher,’ Music and Modernism will re-evaluate the significant connections between the disciplines of music and fine art in the period covering the emergence and flowering of Modernism, c. 1849 – 1950.  During this time both music and fine art were concerned with issues of equality, equivalence, relativity and subjectivity – themes that have since been taken as key to the definition of Modernism. Composers and artists repeatedly borrowed from one another, yet their motives have seldom been explored. Did such quotation amount to a conscious statement of their modernity, or was this merely a symptom of shared interests? This study day will question not only what it was music gave to fine art, or fine art music, but will ask whether we can in fact think in terms of two opposing directions of influence in this period at all.

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2009 LONDON seminar IN ROMAN ART

‘Discrimina Ordinum’ in Roman Theatres: The Literary & Archaeological Evidence

Monday, 18 May 2009

17.30, Seminar Room 1

Speaker(s): Professor Frank Sear (University of Melbourne)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Peter Stewart and Amanda Claridge



LONDON SEMINAR FOR EARLY MODERN VISUAL CULTURE

Jacques Callot in Florence, 1617. Artistic Imitation and Social Reform in the Capricci di Varie Figure

Monday, 18 May 2009
18.00, Research Forum South Room (note venue)

Speaker(s): Sheila McTighe (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Mechthild Fend (m.fend@ucl.ac.uk) and Satish Padiyar (satish.padiyar@courtauld.ac.uk)

This seminar series has been organised jointly by The Courtauld Institute of Art’s Research Forum and University College London



The Function of the Studio: Four Artists in Conversation

Wednesday, 20 May 2009

17.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Antony Gormley's studio (detail)
Gautier Deblonde, Antony Gormley’s Studio (detail)

Speaker(s): Artists Shezad Dawood, Gautier Deblonde, Antony Gormley and Andrew Grassie

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Giles Waterfield and Christopher Griffin

Further information: In 1971 the French artist Daniel Buren published an essay titled ‘The Function of the Studio’ in which he expounded his “distrust” of the studio and its “simultaneously idealising and ossifying function”. As a manifesto for his own critical practice, Buren’s essay proposed the “extinction” of the studio, paving the way for what has since been called a ‘post-studio’ era. Despite this, however, artists today still choose to work from studios, whether they be isolated work spaces or entrepreneurial offices. And many, in keeping with a long art historical tradition, continue to make the artist’s studio the subject of their work. This discussion will bring together Shezad Dawood, Gautier Deblonde, Antony Gormley and Andrew Grassie – four internationally-acclaimed artists working in a variety of media – to ask ‘What is the function, and significance, of the studio for artists working today?'

The Artist’s Studio, an exhibition at Compton Verney, Warwickshire, will run from 26 September – 13 December 2009





Research seminar: MEDIEVAL WORK IN PROGRESS

Muniments and Monuments: Camden, Brooke’s Discoverie and the Challenges of the Visual

Thursday, 28 May 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Phillip Lindley (University of Leicester)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor John Lowden



CONFERENCE

A Rajput Pleasure Palace: the Art of Nagaur in Context

Saturday, 30 May 2009

09.45 - 18.15, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre (with registration from 09.15)

Nagaur wall painting of lasies, clouds, lightning bolts
Nagaur, Sheesh Mahal: vault painting with ladies amid clouds and lightning bolts (Photo: The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Speaker(s): Ilay Cooper (independent scholar), Rosemary Crill (Victoria & Albert Museum), Catherine Glynn (independent scholar), Karni Jasol (Mehrangarh Museum Trust), Charlotte Martin de Fonjaudran (The Courtauld Institute of Art), David Park (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Giles Tillotson (independent scholar), Sibylla Tringham (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: £15 (£10 concessions and Courtauld staff and students). Please send a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Coordinator & Administrator, Research Forum, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, clearly stating that you wish to book for the ‘Rajput Pleasure Palace’ conference, and indicating whether you will be attending the reception. For credit card bookings call 020 7848 2785/2909. For further information, send an email to ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by: Professor David Park (The Courtauld Institute of Art) in association with the Department of Asia, the British Museum

Further information: Set on the edge of the Thar Desert, 85 miles north-east of Jodhpur, Nagaur Fort is an extraordinary site covering 37 acres and protected by a ring of massive bastions. But its most remarkable feature is the complex of exquisite pleasure palaces constructed in the reign of Maharajah Bakhat Singh (1725-51), unified with gardens and water features in an elegant geometric plan. Its superb wall paintings — including depictions of women of the court bathing, dancing and picnicking — are closely related to contemporary portable paintings produced at Nagaur and Jodhpur, many of which have only recently been discovered. Results of recent research on both types of painting as well as their architectural and Rajasthan context will be presented at the conference, which is planned to coincide with the opening of the major exhibition Garden & Cosmos: The Royal Paintings of Jodhpur at The British Museum (28 May - 23 August). The conference will draw on the findings of the ongoing conservation programme on the Nagaur wall paintings by The Courtauld and the Mehrangarh Museum Trust (generously funded by the Getty Foundation and the Helen Hamlyn Trust).

Organised in association with the British Museum, the conference will culminate in a reception at the exhibition.

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JUNE


WRITING ART HISTORY

Writing about Giotto

Monday, 1 June 2009

17.00 - 19.00, Research Forum South Room (with registration from 16.30)

statue of Giotto by Giovanni Dupre, 1844 Statue of Giotto, by Giovanni Duprè, 1844, Uffizi, Florence. Photograph: Negative number: A80/787. © The Courtauld Institute of Art.

Speaker(s): Anne Derbes (Hood College, Maryland), Laura Jacobus (Birkbeck College, University of London), Mark Sandona (Hood College, Maryland)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, places are free but limited and therefore need to be booked in advance. Please make a booking by emailing ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk by midday Friday 29 May 2009. Please note that we will not be able to respond to any requests for bookings after this time but there may still be places available on the day and you are welcome to turn up as any remaining places will be made available on a first-come-first-served basis.

Organised by: Dr Joanna Cannon

Further information: Whereas many artists of the Duecento and Trecento have not been the subject of even a single monograph, the literature on Giotto is extensive.  Two volumes of his bibliography have been published (1938 and 1973) and in the twenty-first century writing on Giotto continues to grow. Within the last year, six substantial books have been published about Giotto – four of them focusing on the Arena Chapel – and an extensive Giotto exhibition, with accompanying catalogue, is currently being held in Rome.  The panel for this round-table discussion consists of three authors of recent Giotto books: Anne Derbes and Mark Sandona (Hood College, Maryland), authors of The Usurer’s Heart: Giotto, Enrico Scrovegni and the Arena Chapel in Padua (University Park: Penn State Press, 2008) and editors of The Cambridge Companion to Giotto (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004) and Laura Jacobus (Birkbeck College, University of London), author of Giotto and the Arena Chapel: Art, Architecture and Experience (London: Harvey Miller, 2008).  Among the issues they will be invited to address are: the burden of pre-existing literature; the challenge of finding new approaches to writing about Giotto; the special nature of writing about Giotto; publishers and books on Giotto; dealing with Giotto’s fame.  The audience is invited to participate in the discussion, chaired by Joanna Cannon.

Organised by Giotto’s Circle within the Writing Art History project.



RESEARCH SEMINAR: MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY

The Artist According to Alighiero E Boetti

Monday, 1 June 2009 CANCELLED

17.30, Seminar Room 1

Speaker(s): Mark Godfrey (Tate Modern)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Caroline Arscott and Professor Mignon Nixon



WRITING ART HISTORY

The Patron’s Turn: Giotto, Enrico Scrovegni, and the Arena Chapel in Padua

Tuesday, 2 June 2009

17.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

'Rising of Lazarus', painting by Giotto, Arena Chapel, Padua
Raising of Lazarus (detail), Giotto, Arena Chapel, Padua. Photo: Giuliano Ghiraldini. By kind permission of the Assessorato ai Musei, Politiche Culturali e Spettacolo del Comune di Padova.

Speaker(s): Anne Derbes (Professor of Art, Hood College, Maryland) and Mark Sandona (Professor of English, Hood College, Maryland)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Joanna Cannon

Further information: Why did Enrico Scrovegni construct the Arena Chapel and commission its elaborate fresco programme? Recent scholarly assessments see the nexus between the patron and his civic context as untroubled. We will make the case that the programme strikes a delicate balance between ostentation and penitence. Both with documentary and visual evidence, we argue that the patron’s efforts reflect more than civic magnanimity; he also seeks to represent himself as reintegrated into the Christian community.

Organised by Giotto’s Circle within the Writing Art History project.







Alternative Modernisms Seminar Series

Bhupen Khakhar and the ‘Baroda School’: Indigenist and internationalist?

Tuesday, 2 June 2009
17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Timothy Hyman (painter and writer)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Deborah Swallow and Professor Partha Mitter

Further information: When India's first post-Independence art school took shape in Baroda, the founders broke with British colonial traditions, looking instead both to modernism and to Tagore's visionary university at Santiniketan. Baroda's guiding teacher, K.G. Subramanyan, had been the young assistant on the great mural painted at Santiniketan in 1947 by Benode Behari Mukherjee (who was mentor also to the filmmaker Satyajit Ray). But the full flowering of Baroda came in the 1970s and 1980s. The art of Bhupen Khakhar (1934-2003) would develop from his icons of 'The Insignificant Man', to such large-scale panoramas as You Can't Please All (1981, Tate); eventually,  to a courageous imagery of homosexual love. International recognition culminated in Khakhar's 2002 retrospective at the Reina Sofia, Madrid. Meanwhile, Baroda's lively cultural debate had been largely swamped by the booming Indian art-market.

Timothy Hyman is a painter and writer. His next solo exhibition is scheduled for October 2009 at Austin/Desmond. He first visited Baroda in 1981 and his book on Bhupen Khakhar came out in 1998. Thames and Hudson have published his monographs on Bonnard and Sienese Painting. He was lead curator for the Tate's Stanley Spencer retrospective in 2001, and co-curated British Vision at Ghent in 2007-08.



CONFERENCE

Artists' Writings 1850-Present

14.30 - 18.00, Thursday 4 June 2009 (with registration from 14.00)

10.00 - 17.30, Friday 5 June 2009 (with registration from 09.30)

10.00 - 17.00, Saturday 6 June 2009 (with registration from 09.30)

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Illustration by Walter Crane of scholar and figure dressed as crane with quill and paintbrushes
Walter Crane, illustration to John Meiklejohn, The Golden Primer, 1884. Source: The Golden Primer, Part 1 by Prof JM Meiklejohn and Walter Crane.  London and Edinburgh: William Blackwood & Sons, 1884
Speaker(s): Bridget Alsdorf (Princeton University), Kenneth Bendiner (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), Faith Binckes (Oxford University), Grace Brockington (University of Bristol), Nicholas Chare (University of Reading), Peter Cooke (University of Manchester), Ann Compton (University of Glasgow), Julia K. Dabbs (University of Minnesota, Morris), James Faure Walker (artist; Camberwell College of Arts), Richard Hobbs (University of Bristol), John House (Courtauld Institute of Art), Sylvia Karastathi (University of Cambridge), Emma Kimberley (University of Leicester), Yvonne Kyriakides (artist), Michelle Letowska (artist), Anna Lovatt (University of Nottingham), Peter Maber (University of Cambridge), Nina Parish (University of Bath), Dina Ramadan (Columbia University), Christina Rosenberger (Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art, Harvard University Art Museum), Deborah Schultz (University of Sussex), Dave Smith (artist), Rachel Sloan (independent art historian), Lisa Tickner (Courtauld Institute of Art), Aurélie Verdier (Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales), Duncan White (Central St Martins)

Ticket/entry details: £40 (£20 concessions) Please send a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Co-ordinator, Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, clearly stating that you wish to book for the ‘Artists’ Writings 1850 – Present conference’. For credit card bookings call 020 7848 2785/2909. For further information, send an e-mail to ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk.

Organised by: Dr Linda Goddard

Further information: Despite Matisse’s warning that ‘he who wants to dedicate himself to painting should start by cutting out his tongue’, artists in the modern period have frequently expressed themselves in writing (whether memoir, fiction or theory). This conference will ask what motivates artists to write, how they view the relation between their visual and textual practice, and how they use writing to manipulate or challenge the public reception and critical interpretation of their work. Challenging the myth of the visual artist as an intuitive anti-intellectual, it will demonstrate the extent and diversity of artists’ contributions to modern literature and criticism in various languages. It will also investigate how scholars interpret these texts: are they works of art in themselves or simply evidence about the artist’s life and craft? Do they conceal as much as they reveal? How has the role and perception of artists’ writings changed over time?

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Please address enquiries to linda.goddard@courtauld.ac.uk




CONFERENCE

1789, 1989, 2009: Changing Perspectives on Post-Revolutionary Art

10.00 - 17.45, Friday 12 June 2009 (with registration from 09.30)

10.00 - 18.15, Saturday 13 June 2009 (with registration from 09.30)

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

'Young Woman Drawing' by Marie-Denise Villers, 1801
Young Woman Drawing, 1801, Marie-Denise Villers (French, 1774–1821). Oil on canvas; 63 1/2 x 50 5/8 in. (161.3 x 128.6 cm). Mr. and Mrs. Isaac D. Fletcher Collection, Bequest of Isaac D. Fletcher, 1917 (17.120.204). www.metmuseum.org

Speaker(s): Juliet Bellow (American University, Washington DC), Sarah Betzer (University of Virginia), Leo Costello (Rice University), Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire (Columbia University, New York), Amy Freund (Texas Christian University), Lela Graybill (University of Utah), Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby (University of California, Berkeley), Daniel Harkett (Rhode Island School of Design), Katie Hornstein (University of Michigan), Anne Lafont (Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art, Paris), Valerie Mainz (University of Leeds), Arpita Mitra (Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi), Adrian Rifkin (Goldsmiths, University of London), Jordan Rose (University of California, Berkeley), Susan Siegfried (University of Michigan), Richard Taws (McGill University), Melanie Ulz (University of Cologne), Melanie Vandenbrouck-Przybylski (The Courtauld Institute of Art and Victoria & Albert Museum), Sue Walker (University College London), Beth Wright (University of Texas at Arlington), with opening address by Satish Padiyar (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: £35 (£15 concessions) Please send a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Co-ordinator, Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, clearly stating that you wish to book for the ‘Post-revolutionary French art conference’. For credit card bookings call 020 7848 2785/2909. For further information, send an e-mail to ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by: Katie Hornstein (University of Michigan), Dr Satish Padiyar (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Melanie Vandenbrouck-Przybylski (The Courtauld Institute of Art and Victoria & Albert Museum), Susannah Walker (University College London). Email for organisers: c19conference2009@gmail.com

Further information: The coincidence of the bicentenary of the French Revolution and the ending of the Cold War in the 1990s signaled renewed interest in the relations between representation and subjectivity in Post-Revolutionary France.

However, in a post-9/11 world, scholars within the field find themselves at a crossroads between established approaches and a shifting political landscape. As economic anxieties now come to the fore, the conference will question whether methodologies that privilege subjectivity, the body and desire can be developed to articulate current global concerns or are they being supplanted by new interpretative models?

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Organised by The Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum and University College London Department of History of Art with the support of the University of Michigan


University College London logoUniversity of Michigan logo





CONFERENCE

Photo Archives and the Photographic Memory of Art History

09.30 - 18.30, Tuesday 16 June 2009 (with registration from 09.00)
10.00 - 17.30, Wednesday 17 June 2009 (with registration from 09.30)

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

(followed by part two of the conference in autumn 2009 at the Kunsthistorisches Institut, Florence)

Photo of Witt Library archive material showing Sir Benjamin West's design for stained glass window, 'Conversion of St Paul'
Sir Benjamin West, Conversion of St. Paul, s & d 1786. Design for stained glass window, St. Paul’s, Birmingham. Photo courtesy the Witt Library, The Courtauld Institute of Art

Speaker(s): Stephen Bann (University of Bristol), Margaret Bellinger (Yale University), Mary Bergstein (Rhode Island School of Design), Pascal Griener (University of Neuchatel, Switzerland), Antony Griffiths (British Museum, Department of Prints and Drawings), Rudolph Gschwind (University of Basel), Venetia Harlow (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Mark Haworth-Booth (University of the Arts London and Victoria and Albert Museum), Machtelt Israels (University of Amsterdam), Ann Jensen Adams (University of California, Santa Barbara), Geraldine Johnson (History of Art, University of Oxford), Christine Kuan (ARTstor), Hubert Locher (Deutsches Dokumentationszentrum für Kunstgeschichte Bildarchiv Foto Marburg and Kunstgeschichtliches Institut der Philipps-Universität, Marburg), Andrea Mattiello (Independent Art Historian), Dorothea Peters (Zentralinstitut Für Kuntgeschichte), Jim Reilly (Rochester Institute of Technology), Elisabeth Reissner (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Per Rumberg (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Graham Smith (University of Saint Andrews, Scotland), Stuart Whatling (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: £15 (£10 concessions) Please send a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Co-ordinator, Research Forum, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, clearly stating that you wish to book for the ‘Photo Archives and the Photographic Memory of Art History conference’. For credit card bookings call 020 7848 2785/2909. For further information, send an e-mail to ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by: Professor Pat Rubin (The Courtauld Institute of Art) in collaboration with Dr Costanza Caraffa (Kunsthistorisches Institut, Florence)

Further information: This conference will investigate the role of photographic archives and collections in art historical studies. The discipline of art history and the technologies image reproduction have developed concurrently and their own histories are closely interlinked. The first part of the conference will take place in London, where the focus will be on the role of photography in shaping art history, with an emphasis on image collections that were formed “scientifically” – that is with the specific purpose of aiding research. The second part of the conference will be held in Florence in the autumn of 2009, where the history, nature, and influence of specific archives will be discussed.

A second purpose of this conference will be to look strategically at the management of large photographic collections, using the perspective of their history to face the challenges of the future.

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WRITING ART HISTORY SEMINAR

Curating Contemporary Art

Friday 19 June 2009

16.00 – 18.00, Research Forum South Room

Installation of 'Quid Pro Quo' exhibition in The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York 2006
Quid Pro Quo exhibition installation view, 2006. The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York. Photo: Adam Reich. Courtesy of The Studio Museum in Harlem

Speaker(s): Naomi Beckwith (Curator, Studio Museum, Harlem), Matthew Poole (Programme Director, Centre for Curatorial Studies; Director of the MA in Gallery Studies & Critical Curating,  University of Essex), Lucy Steeds (Associate Editor, Afterall Books)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Catherine Grant and Professor Patricia Rubin

Further information: This informal seminar brings together three speakers with very different perspectives on curating. Each speaker will present briefly on their own practice and then discussion with be invited with the audience on the curating of contemporary art. The focus on the session will be the impact of curation on the writing of art history, and how different models of curating are being employed in the presentation of contemporary art. This session is designed to complement the one-day symposium taking place on Saturday, 20 June 2009, on The Formats of Art History: the Exhibition and the Art Book.

The three speakers are: Naomi Beckwith, curator at the Studio Museum in Harlem; Matthew Poole, Programme Director of the Centre for Curatorial Studies, Director of the MA in Gallery Studies & Critical Curating at The University of Essex and a freelance curator, and Lucy Steeds, who is part of the editorial team responsible for a new series of books entitled Exhibition Histories (to be published by Afterall and distributed by The MIT Press), which will focus on recent exhibitions of contemporary art and consider how they have changed the way we think about art.

Naomi Beckwith is Assistant Curator at The Studio Museum in Harlem whose particular concerns focus on identity and critical practices in contemporary art. Her master's thesis on Adrian Piper and Carrie Mae Weems earned Distinction from The Courtauld Institute of Art. Prior to joining the Studio Museum, Beckwith was project coordinator for BAMart at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, a Helena Rubenstein Critical Studies Fellow at the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program and, most recently, the Whitney Lauder Curatorial Fellow at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia. Beckwith is a recent grant recipient of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, a guest blogger for Art21 at PBS.org and Ubu Web. Beckwith sits on the board of The Laundromat Project and she has curated and co-curated several exhibitions at the ICA in Philadelphia and in New York at Cuchifritos, Artists Space and at the Studio Museum where she also manages the Artists in Residence programme.

Matthew Poole is Programme Director of the Centre for Curatorial Studies and Director of the MA in Gallery Studies & Critical Curating at The University of Essex. As well as lecturing, Matthew works as a freelance curator and collaborates with a wide variety of contemporary artists. He has experience working for a number of arts organisations and galleries both in the public and private sectors. His previous positions include: Curator for The Economist Building in St. James’s, London; Assistant Curator at Gasworks Gallery in Vauxhall; Assistant Curator of the UNILEVER art collection and freelance project manager for the Contemporary Art Society. Matthew is also a co-founder and currently a Director of PILOT, an international contemporary artists' & curators' forum and online archive [www.pilotlondon.org]. His recent research has focused on the relationship between the projected video image and architecture. The findings of this research have been presented both through writing and through a series of exhibitions, symposia and conferences, supported in part by funding from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Lucy Steeds is an associate editor with Afterall, a research and publishing organisation based at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London. She is also a part-time PhD candidate in the Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London. Her previous employment includes six years in the exhibitions department at Arnolfini, a centre for the contemporary arts in Bristol. Lucy Steeds is the author of several catalogue essays (most recently on the work of John Wood and Paul Harrison) and she writes for the contemporary art press, most often Art Monthly.





WRITING ART HISTORY CONFERENCE

The Formats of Art History: The Art Book and the Exhibition

Saturday, 20 June 2009

10.00 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre (with registration from 09.30)

Exhibition catalogue cover: 'Andrea Riccio: Renaissance Master of Bronze' (bronze horseman)
Riccio: Renaissance Master of Bronze
, exhibition catalogue cover. Courtesy The Frick Collection, New York

Speaker(s): Denise Allen (Frick Collection), Naomi Beckwith (Studio Museum Harlem), Caroline Blinder (Goldsmiths, University of London), Mario Carpo (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta), Steffen Haug (Humboldt University, Berlin), Matthew Poole (University of Essex), Pepper Stetler (University of Delaware)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, places are free but need to be booked in advance by Wednesday 17 June 2009. Please email ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk or call 020 7848 2785/2909 and state that you wish to book for the ‘Writing Art History: The Formats of Art History’ conference.

Organised by: Dr Catherine Grant and Professor Patricia Rubin

Further information: This symposium looks at the ways in which art history is presented, focusing on various book formats – from the monograph to the photo-book – and the exhibition – from curating little known masters of the Renaissance to issues in the contemporary gallery.

By considering the format of art history, aspects of analysis and argument – whether visual or verbal – come into focus in ways that are often obscured. What can be learnt about the pedagogical and didactic functions of the formats of art history, and what assumptions are embedded in traditional formats such as the monograph? What is the importance of experimentation with accepted formats?

By paying attention to these often marginalised issues, the speakers will consider the intertwining of ideological and aesthetic decisions that are embedded in the formats of art history.

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COLLECTING AND THE COURTAULD COLLECTIONS WORKSHOP

Record or Representation? Photography and the Artist's Studio

Monday, 22 June 2009

12.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Research Forum Research Associates: Claire Brisby, Katie Faulkner, Joanna Milk and Gregory Salter

Ticket/entry details: Open to Courtauld Institute of Art research active staff, postgraduate students and Associate Scholars. Please book in advance by sending an email to Ingrid Guiot (ResearchForumEvents@ courtauld.ac.uk) by 12 noon, Thursday 18 June 2009.

Organised by: Geoffrey Fisher, Barbara Thompson and Professor Patricia Rubin

Further information: This is the second of two presentations by this year's Research Associates appointed to the Courtauld Collections project. The Research Associates will use the material from the Witt and Conway libraries to explore the theme: Record or Representation? Photography and the Artist's Studio.




A Discussion with Jacqueline Rose

‘Why War? – Psychoanalysis, Politics and the Return to Melanie Klein’

Tuesday, 23 June 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Professor Jacqueline Rose (Queen Mary, University of London)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Henrietta Stanford and Cesar Cortez

Further information: Taking up the question that preoccupied Freud in the years following World War I, Jacqueline Rose’s seminal work Why War? psychoanalysis, politics and the return to Melanie Klein (1993) situates war discourse within a theoretical framework at the interface of psychoanalysis and political theory. Bringing the psychical and the social into a dynamic encounter, Rose's powerful analysis of the psychodynamics of war and conservative politics possesses particular resonance in the current national and global political climate.

In this seminar, organised by the Psychoanalysis Society and supported by the Research Forum, Jacqueline Rose will join members of the Courtauld community to engage in a discussion of this important text, the relevance of psychoanalysis to art history and the re-emergence of Melanie Klein in academic discourse.

An optional reading group session in the week leading up to the event will provide members of The Courtauld Institute the opportunity to discuss the text prior to Professor Rose’s arrival.

Professor Jacqueline Rose (Queen Mary, University of London) is a leading authority on the subject of psychoanalysis, literature and politics. Her seminal works have deployed psychoanalysis to question collective social fantasies surrounding childhood, sexuality, literature, nationhood and art. Her works include The Case of Peter Pan, Why War? psychoanalysis, politics and the return to Melanie Klein and Sexuality in the Field of Vision. Her most recent publication is The Question of Zion. She has published a novel, Albertine, and contributes regularly to the London Review of Books.




JULY


PROFESSOR DAME GILLIAN BEER FBA

The Backbone Shiver: Darwin and the Arts

Wednesday, 1 July 2009

18.45 - 19.45 (with registration from 18.15, Williams Lounge)

Henry Wellcome Auditorium, Wellcome Collection Conference Centre, 183 Euston Road, London, NW1 2BE

Professor Dame Gillian Beer
Professor Dame Gillian Beer FBA, Photo: Julie Hedgecoe (University of Cambridge)

Speaker(s): Professor Dame Gillian Beer FBA (Professor Emeritus, University of Cambridge)

Ticket/entry details: £10. Please complete a booking form and send it with a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Co-ordinator, Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN. For credit card bookings call 020 7848 2785/2909. For further information, send an e-mail to ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by: Dr Fae Brauer (University of East London and The University of New South Wales), Dr Barbara Larson (University of West Florida) and Dr Gavin Parkinson (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Further information: This lecture by Professor Dame Gillian Beer, leading scholar of nineteenth-century Victorian literature, highlights some of Darwin’s most intriguing responses to the visual arts and music and their presence in his later work.

Gillian Beer is author of the groundbreaking Darwin’s Plots: Evolutionary Narrative in Darwin, George Eliot, and Nineteenth-Century Fiction, along with other major volumes on evolution such as Open Fields: Science in Cultural Encounter. The former book has just been published in its third edition and will be made available to the public at the time of the lecture.

Gillian Beer is King Edward VII Professor Emeritus at the University of Cambridge. She was made Dame Commander of the British Empire in 1998 for services to British literature and is a Fellow of the British Academy and of the Royal Society of Literature. She is president of the British Comparative Literature Association and the British Literature and Science Society and is General Editor of the series Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth Century Literature and Culture.

The lecture will be followed by a reception in the Williams Lounge.

Professor Dame Gillian Beer’s lecture is offered in conjunction with the conference, The Art of Evolution: Charles Darwin and Visual Cultures, at The Courtauld Institute of Art from 2 - 4 July 2009. See entry below for details.

Bookings for both the conference, The Art of Evolution: Charles Darwin and Visual Cultures, and Professor Dame Gillian Beer's lecture can be made using the same form.

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with the collaboration of

 

Wellcome Trust logo





CONFERENCE

The Art of Evolution: Charles Darwin and Visual Cultures


09.45 - 18.00, Thursday 2 July 2009 (registration from 09.15; plus book launch from 18.00)

09.40 - 20.00, Wednesday 3 July 2009 (registration from 09.10)

10.00 - 18.00, Saturday 4 July 2009 ( registration from 09.30; plus play reading from 18.30)

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

'Evolution II' by Nancy Burson, 1984 (face a cross of human and ape)
Nancy Burson, Evolution II, 1984. Gelatin silver print, 7 x 7.2 in. / 17.7 x 18.3 cm. © Courtesy the artist

Speaker(s): Giovanni Aloi (Editor in Chief of Antennae, The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture; Queen Mary University of London), Suzanne Anker (School of Visual Arts, New York City), Bergit Arends (Natural History Museum, London), Caroline Arscott (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Fae Brauer (University of East London; The University of New South Wales), Christina Cogdell (University of California, Davis), Barbara Creed (University of Melbourne), Whitney Davis (University of California, Berkeley), Marion Endt (Henry Moore Foundation), Sabine Flach (Zentrum für Literatur-und Kulturforschung Berlin), Maria P. Gindhart (Georgia State University, Ernest G. Welch School of Art and Design), Rikke Hansen (Tate Britain), Jeanette Hoorn (University of Melbourne), Serena Keshavjee (University of Winnepeg), Barbara Larson (University of West Florida), Arthur MacGregor (formerly of the Ashmolean Museum), Jeremy Melius (Yale Center for British Art), Marsha Morton (Pratt Institute), Gavin Parkinson (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Phillip Prodger (Peabody Essex Museum), Donna Roberts (independent scholar), Cannon Schmitt (University of Toronto), Monique Scott (American Museum of Natural History), Pat Simpson (University of Hertfordshire), Jonathan Smith (University of Michigan, Dearborn), Sarah Thomas (University of Sydney), and with artists Tania Kovats and Phyllida Barlow in conversation

Ticket/entry details: £70 (£30 students/concessions). Special last minute offer: bookings for the conference can now be made for single days i.e. £25 per day (£15 per day students/concessions).

Please complete a booking form and send it with a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Co-ordinator, Research Forum, The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN. For credit card bookings call 020 7848 2785/2909. For further information, send an e-mail to ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by: Dr Fae Brauer (University of East London and The University of New South Wales), Dr Barbara Larson (University of West Florida) and Dr Gavin Parkinson (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Further information: In this Darwin bicentenary year, the full impact of the research and theories of the naturalist who spent most of his life at Down House, Kent, is coming to the fore. Few intellectual disciplines have remained untouched by the thought of Charles Darwin, as revealed by visual cultures in the form of art, anthropological, medical, and scientific imagery, as well as the popular images that feature in the press. This is the subject matter of the conference and events to be held under the title, The Art of Evolution: Charles Darwin and Visual Cultures, at The Courtauld Institute of Art, 2-4 July 2009.

The Art of Evolution: Charles Darwin and Visual Cultures will explore the impact of Charles Darwin on visual cultures through the examination of aesthetics, the museum, slavery and concepts of indigenous people, as well as the representation of animals. It will investigate the repercussions of Darwin's theories upon images of the body, eugenics and genetics, sexualities, Surrealism, film and contemporary art. Including exhibitions and film screenings, the conference will conclude with a reading of Justin Fleming's provocative new play, Origin, directed by Wayne Harrison.

The book, The Art of Evolution: Darwin, Darwinisms and Visual Culture, co-edited by Barbara Larson and Fae Brauer, will be launched at this conference.

The conference is also offered in conjunction with a lecture by Professor Dame Gillian Beer FBA (University of Cambridge). Her lecture, organised in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust, is entitled The Backbone Shiver: Darwin and the Arts, and will take place 6.45 - 7.45pm, Wednesday, 1 July 2009, at the Henry Wellcome Auditorium, Wellcome Collection Conference Centre, 183 Euston Road, London, NW1 2BE. See above for further details.

Bookings for both the conference and Professor Dame Gillian Beer's lecture can be made using the same form.


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ONLY COLLECT! WHAT AMERICANS SEE IN BLOOMSBURY

Tuesday, 7 July 2009

18.00, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Omega Workshops design (attributed to Roger Fry) with two peacocks 1913-14
Omega Workshops (attributed to Roger Fry) Design with Confronted Peacocks, 1913-14. © The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London.

Speaker(s): Professor Christopher Reed (Associate Professor of English and Visual Culture at Pennsylvania State University)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Alexandra Gerstein

Further information: This talk explores the crucial role played by North American collectors in the revival of interest in the Omega Workshops and other aspects of the Bloomsbury artists' careers. Christopher Reed is Associate Professor of English and Visual Culture of the Pennsylvania State University. He is a leading authority on Bloomsbury visual culture and was commissioned to write the introduction to The Courtauld Gallery's latest exhibition catalogue, Beyond Bloomsbury: Designs of the Omega Workshops, 1913-19 (18 June – 20 September 2009). Reed has also recently co-organised the exhibition, A Room of their Own: The Bloomsbury Artists in American Collections, which will be on display from July through to October at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University in New York, one of six American venues.