September to December

All events were held at The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, unless stated otherwise. Events were free and open to members of the public unless otherwise stated.

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SIMPLE WEAVE AUTOMATED THREAD COUNTING FROM x-RAYS OF PAINTINGS on CANVAS

Monday, 21 September 2009

09.30 - 13.00 , Seminar Room 1

X-ray and weave analysis of Vincent van Gogh's 'Wild Roses'
From x-ray to weave analysis: Wild Roses, Van Gogh Museum (Vincent van Gogh Foundation)

Speaker(s): Dr Ella Hendriks (Head of Conservation, Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam), Dr C Richard Johnson, Jr (Geoffrey S M Hedrick Senior Professor of Engineering, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University), Dr Don H Johnson (J S Abercrombie Professor Emeritus of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University)

Ticket/entry details: Attendance is limited to 30 persons on a first-come, first-served basis. Registration is now closed.

Organised by: Drs. Aviva Burnstock and Ella Hendriks

Further information: An interdisciplinary team will present a half-day Tutorial Workshop on the automated study of canvas weave from x-rays. Workshop participants will receive user training for a newly developed software tool that produces and archives accurate local (or spot) thread counts from x-rays of paintings on plain weave canvas. Examples of using the tool to create weave maps, which provide overall mapping of canvas weave density variations across a picture support, will be shown. The tool also provides thread angle maps, which measure and record weave distortions such as cusping from stretching. Together these different types of information can help, for example, to match pieces of canvas cut from the same bolt of primed canvas or to identify later additions and mutilations to canvas picture supports. The Van Gogh case studies will illustrate how use of the new tool, evaluated against traditional hand thread count methods, can lead to more advanced findings.

For a more detailed description of the workshop programme, see workshop website: http://www.ece.rice.edu/~dhj/Workshop.


Organised in collaboration with:

van Gogh Museum logo



OCTOBER

LONDON ANCIENT HISTORY/ROMAN ART SEMINAR

The Dolichenum on the Aventine: Archaeological Evidence, Cult Rituals, and Topographical Considerations


Thursday 1 October 2009

16.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Blair Fowlkes Childs (Institute of Fine Arts, NYU)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe, King's College London and Peter Stewart, The Courtauld Institute of Art

Further information: Supported by the Institute of Classical Studies, The Courtauld Institute of Art’s Research Forum and Royal Holloway University of London




Research SEMINAR: MODERN AND CONTEMpoRARy

Possibilities of Redefinition - Romanian Art in the Light of Socialism, 1950-65

Monday 5 October 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Alina Serban (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Caroline Arscott



EXhibiting research ii

Delivering the Message

Tuesday 6 October 2009

17.00 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Ken Arnold (Head of Public Programmes, The Wellcome Trust), Tim Boon (Chief Curator, The Science Museum), Geoffrey Crossick (Warden of Goldsmiths, University of London), Xerxes Mazda (Head of Learning and Audiences, The British Museum)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: The MA Programme ‘Curating the Art Museum’ in collaboration with the Research Forum

Further information: What happens to research when it is transformed into an exhibition? Who is its audience? How should we define research-led exhibitions? Join a panel of speakers as they discuss the most successful way of making research exciting and relevant to a wider public. Ken Arnold, as chair, will lead the discussion as the speakers draw on their experiences at diverse institutions to elucidate these issues.

This panel discusson is part of the 2009 Exhibiting Research Series, organised by the MA Programme ‘Curating the Art Museum’ in collaboration with the Research Forum. Four sessions over the course of the year explore how museums and galleries confront the relationship between research, exhibitions and their public. A wide range of speakers engage in discussion and debate on urgent issues of policy and practice.

The event will be followed by a reception and informal discussion. For further information please contact: macurating@courtauld.ac.uk



LONDON ANCIENT HISTORY/ROMAN ART SEMINAR

Architecture and Garden: A Study in Roman Space

Thursday 8 October 2009

16.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr Elizabeth Macaulay Lewis (University of Oxford)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe, King's College London (sophie.lunn-rockliffe@kcl.ac.uk) and Peter Stewart, The Courtauld Institute of Art (peter.stewart@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: Supported by the Institute of Classical Studies, The Courtauld Institute of Art’s Research Forum and Royal Holloway University of London




LONDON seminar for early modern visual culture

Renaissance Faciality

Monday 12 October 2009

18.00, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr. Maria Loh (University College London)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Rose Marie San Juan (r.sanjuan@ucl.ac.uk) and Joanna Woodall (joanna.woodall@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: This seminar series has been organised jointly by The Courtauld Institute of Art's Research Forum and University College London




Research SEMINAR: HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY

An August Sander of the Middle East? Akram Zaatari's El Madani Projects as 'Equivocal Documents'

Wednesday 14 October 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr Sophie Berrebi (Art History Institute, University of Amsterdam)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Alexandra Moschovi, Julian Stallabrass and Benedict Burbridge

Further information: The History of Photography research seminar series aims to be a discursive platform for the discussion and dissemination of current research on photography.  From art as photography and early photographic technology to ethnographic photographs and contemporary photography as art, the seminar welcomes contributions from researchers across the board, whether independent or affiliated with museums, galleries, archives, libraries or higher education, and endeavours to provide scholars with a challenging opportunity to present work in progress and test out new ideas.

The seminars usually take place once a term, on Wednesday evenings at 5.30pm in the Research Forum.

Contact Alexandra Moschovi (alexandra.moschovi@courtauld.ac.uk), Julian Stallabrass (julian.stallabrass@courtauld.ac.uk) or Benedict Burbridge (benedict.burbridge@courtauld.ac.uk) for further information



STUDY DAY
SIght and Sound in the Street


Saturday 17 October 2009

10.30 - 16.45 (with registration from 10.00)
Research Forum South Room, The Courtauld Institute of Art, London

Street scene in Early Modern Europe

Speaker(s): Niall Atkinson (Texas Christian University), Angus Carlyle (CRISAP - University of the Arts London), Ornette Clennon (Oxford Brookes University), Alexander Cowan (Northumbria University), Flora Dennis (University of Sussex), Liz Horodowitz (New Mexico State University), Terhi Rantanen (London School of Economics), David Rosenthal (Monash University), Joe Young (Artist, Artofnoises)

Ticket/entry details: All welcome but it is necessary to register in advance as numbers are limited. For further information and to register please contact Georgia Clarke (georgia.clarke@courtauld.ac.uk)

Organised by: Georgia Clarke (The Courtauld) and Fabrizio Nevola (University of Bath)

Further information: This study day is part of the Street Life and Street Culture: Between Early Modern Europe and the Present network, funded by the AHRC as part of the Beyond Text project. This study day will consider themes to do with the senses of sight and sound as they impinge upon and inform the public space of the street.

The Street Life and Street Culture network has set out to build an international team of scholars with shared research interests in the interdisciplinary study of urban culture; in particular the relationship between the built environment and the social fabric of Early Modern cities. By entering into a dynamic discourse with specialists from non-historical disciplines, we are pursuing the potential for ‘experiential’ studies of street life, in a two-way discussion linking the historic past to the present.

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DMITRY GUTOV

‘Cho Delat?’ What is to be done?: Marxism and Contemporary Art in Russia


Monday, 19 October 2009

12.00 - 13.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dmitry Gutov (artist)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Sarah Wilson

Further information: Dmitry Gutov will be talking about the work and thought of ten years of the `Chto Delat' artists and writers group and the `New Marxism' as a critical tool in Russia in a time of rampant capitalism and proto-fascist government and economic crisis.

Dmitry Gutov is the most important mid-career Moscow artist and intellectual, the `father' to the contemporary generation, who in the 1990s started work on the projects of the `Karl Marx School of the English Language' and his investigations of Soviet theorist or realism Mikhail Lifchitz. His dialogue with Dr Sarah Wilson (The Courtauld Institute of Art) started in 2005. His Karl Marx project was shown at the Venice Biennale of 2007 and he showed iron calligraphic pieces at the Kassel Documenta this year (see his recent Rembrandt project). He is currently exhibiting at the Moscow and Istanbul Biennales, and the Van Abbe Museum, Eindhoven, has a major installation by the theoretical group Chto Delat to whom he belongs, accompanying Professor John Milner's `El Lissitzky' exhibition.

See www.gutov.ru/works.htm for further information on Gutov.





Research SEMINAR: MODERN AND CONTEMpoRARy

Black Market Memory: Myth and Art in Yugoslavia 1991- 2001

Monday 19 October 2009 CANCELLED

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Alexandra Lazar (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Caroline Arscott



FRANk davis memorial lecture series

Globalisation and Contemporary Art: Video against Globalization

Tuesday 20 October 2009

17.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

sunset scene - Steve McQueen's 'Gravesend', 2007
Gravesend
, Steve McQueen, 2007. Image courtesy the artist

Speaker(s): Dr T. J. Demos (University College London)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Julian Stallabrass (The Courtauld) and Professor Malcolm Bull (University of Oxford)

Further information: Examining select projects of Steve McQueen, the Otolith Group, and Hito Steyerl, this presentation considers how contemporary practitioners of the moving image have creatively and critically reinvented aesthetics in the age of globalisation.

Contemporary art has been radically transformed by globalisation. Biennials sprang up across the world from Korea to Senegal to Brazil, showcasing globalised contemporary art, and inculcating its values in diverse local situations. At the same time, that art was altered as artists from the ‘developing world’, particularly China, India, Latin American and Sub-Saharan Africa, rose to prominence on the global art scene. While much of the art that first came out of that transformation propagandised the virtues of globalisation, new tensions have emerged, from the ‘war on terror’ to the financial crisis, which have led to a strongly documentary and politicised turn in art. In this series, prominent art historians, artists and theorists will examine this striking new configuration. This series has been organised in conjunction with the Research Forum/Andrew W Mellon Foundation M.A. Special Option in the History of Art on ‘Aestheticising Politics? The Political in Globalised Contemporary Art’

T J Demos is a critic and Reader in the Department of Art History, University College London. The author of The Exiles of Marcel Duchamp (MIT Press, 2007), his essays on modern and contemporary art have appeared in international journals such as Artforum, Art Journal, Grey Room, October, and Texte zur Kunst, and in numerous exhibition catalogues (recently, he contributed "The Politics of Sustainability: Contemporary Art and Ecology" to the Barbican's Radical Nature: Art and Architecture for a Changing Planet, 1969-2009). Currently a Fellow at the Flemish Academic Centre for Science and the Arts in Brussels, Demos is working on a new book, provisionally titled Migrations: Contemporary Art and Globalization.

Sponsored by the FM Kirby Foundation



CAROLINE VILLERS RESEARCH FELLOW LECTURE

Ice Age Innovators & Artists: Technical Approaches for Studying Europe’s Oldest Art

Wednesday 21 October 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr Rebecca Farbstein (Caroline Villers Research Fellow 2009-10, The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Aviva Burnstock

Further information: The earliest evidence of art in Europe dates to approximately 40,000 years before present. The famous painted caves of southwest France, including Lascaux and Chauvet, are the most commonly discussed examples of this Ice Age art. However, hunter-gatherer groups occupying Europe at this time also produced a large and diverse corpus of portable art, in the form of small sculptures, statuettes and decorative or ornamental art. More than 150 years of research on this subject has repeatedly focused on the appearance, iconography and supposed “style” of these objects. Rebecca Farbstein’s research departs from this tradition, and instead focuses on technical and material attributes of art to contextualise prehistoric technologies within their social contexts. Using a theoretical and methodological approach built upon the research of art historians, archaeologists, and anthropologists, it is possible to reconstruct the material choices, techniques of manufacture, and production priorities of prehistoric artists. The results of these analyses shed new light on the ways our earliest ancestors mediated their social environments through art production.



LONDON ANCIENT HISTORY/ROMAN ART SEMINAR

Sagalassos and Rome

Thursday 22 October 2009

16.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Professor Marc Waelkens (Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe, King's College London (sophie.lunn-rockliffe@kcl.ac.uk) and Peter Stewart, The Courtauld Institute of Art (peter.stewart@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: Supported by the Institute of Classical Studies, The Courtauld Institute of Art’s Research Forum and Royal Holloway University of London



Research SEMINAR: MEDieval work in progress

Enigma Speculations: The Typological Windows of Anselm’s Choir at Canterbury Cathedral

Thursday 22 October 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): T. A. Heslop (University of East Anglia)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor John Lowden



CONFERENCE

Modernity's Cultural Politics: China in Context

Friday 23 – Saturday 24 October 2009

14.00 - 18.15, 23 October (with registration from 13.30)

10.30 - 18.00, 24 October (with registration from 10.00)

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Xiao Lu, 'Dialogue', 1989. Installation and performance with women in phone booths and another with a gun Xiao Lu, Dialogue, 1989. Installation and performance. Image courtesy of the artistSpeaker(s): include Tani E. Barlow (Rice University), Una Chung (Sarah Lawrence College), Harriet Evans (University of Westminster), Paul Gladston (University of Nottingham at Ningbo, China), Joan Kee (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), Peter Osborne (Middlesex University), Adele Tan (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Tsering Topgyal (London School of Economics), Chaohua Wang (Academica Sinica, Taiwan), Winnie Wong (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Soyoung Yoon (Purchase College, Stanford University), Xudong Zhang (New York University), Yingjin Zhang (University of San Diego)

Ticket/entry details: £25 (£15 concessions and/or students; free for Courtauld students, but pre-booking is required). Please send a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Coordinator, The Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, clearly stating that you wish to book for the ‘Modernity’s Cultural Politics: China conference'. Or call 020 7848 2785/2909 to make a credit card booking. For further information, send an email to ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by: Dr. Julian Stallabrass and Jeannine Tang, with additional moderation from Adele Tan (The Courtauld Institute of Art) and Soyoung Yoon (Purchase College/ Stanford University)

Further information: Modernity's Cultural Politics: China in Context is a two-day conference that asks: what are the formations and functions of cultural production, in representing and intervening ethico-politically into the ongoing projects of modernity, particularly when modernities intersect with processes of globalization? The conference will focus on incomplete projects of Chinese modernities, through panels on critical theory, contemporary art, film and documentary, media and the public sphere, with invited speakers from the Asia, the US and the UK. Topics include, and are not limited to: the intellectual legacy of post-Tiananmen modern critical theory; how forms of art are/have been affected by globalization, feminism and the cultural revolution; the ways in which film – commercial film, auteur film, and documentary – imagine modern politics and publics, and reflect/resist the logic of capital; and the conditions of modern media in an age of intellectual property and Web 2.0, as significant forces in how culture intervenes into the tumultuous processes of modernity, and the modern nation’s struggle for self-definition.

Modernity's Cultural Politics: China in Context is part of LCACE's (London Centre for Arts and Cultural Exchange) Inside Out Festival, 19-25 October 2009, and has been made possible through the generous support of LCACE and the British Academy.

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LCACE 'Inside Out' festival logo LCACE logoBritish Academy logo

     


 

LONDON seminar for early modern visual culture

Early Modern Cultural Analysis: Case Study in Emblematics


Monday 26 October 2009

18.00, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr Agnes Guiderdoni (Université Catholique de Louvain)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Rose Marie San Juan (r.sanjuan@ucl.ac.uk) and Joanna Woodall (joanna.woodall@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: This seminar series has been organised jointly by The Courtauld Institute of Art's Research Forum and University College London



FRANk davis memorial lecture series

Globalisation and Contemporary Art: World Art and Art World

Tuesday 27 October 2009

17.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Matta Placido Opizzi's pyramid of artists which aims to map art as a unified field
Mattia Placido Opizzi: The Art Pyramid

Speaker(s): Malcolm Bull (Research Forum/Andrew W Mellon Foundation MA Visiting Professor from Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, University of Oxford)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Julian Stallabrass (The Courtauld) and Professor Malcolm Bull (University of Oxford)

Further information: The globalisation of contemporary art presents unprecedented challenges to the art historian. Inspired by recent work in world literature, this lecture explores ways of mapping world art as a unified field, and the implications for current debates in art theory and political aesthetics.

Contemporary art has been radically transformed by globalisation. Biennials sprang up across the world from Korea to Senegal to Brazil, showcasing globalised contemporary art, and inculcating its values in diverse local situations. At the same time, that art was altered as artists from the ‘developing world’, particularly China, India, Latin American and Sub-Saharan Africa, rose to prominence on the global art scene. While much of the art that first came out of that transformation propagandised the virtues of globalisation, new tensions have emerged, from the ‘war on terror’ to the financial crisis, which have led to a strongly documentary and politicised turn in art. In this series, prominent art historians, artists and theorists will examine this striking new configuration. This series has been organised in conjunction with the Research Forum/Andrew W Mellon Foundation M.A. Special Option in the History of Art on ‘Aestheticising Politics? The Political in Globalised Contemporary Art’.

Malcolm Bull teaches at the Ruskin School in Oxford, and has also spent periods in the USA as a Getty Scholar and a Clark Fellow. His publications include Seeing Things Hidden (2000), The Mirror of the Gods (2005), and, most recently, (with Anthony Cascardi and T. J. Clark) Nietzsche's Negative Ecologies (2009).

Sponsored by the FM Kirby Foundation



LONDON ANCIENT HISTORY/ROMAN ART SEMINAR

The Colour Purple in Ancient Rome

Thursday 29 October 2009

16.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr Mark Bradley (University of Nottingham)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe, King's College London (sophie.lunn-rockliffe@kcl.ac.uk) and Peter Stewart, The Courtauld Institute of Art (peter.stewart@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: Supported by the Institute of Classical Studies, The Courtauld Institute of Art’s Research Forum and Royal Holloway University of London



NOVEMBER

Research SEMINAR: MODERN AND CONTEMpoRARy

Fragonard/ Twombly: Blindness, Anality and Painting as an Act

Monday 2 November 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr Satish Padiyar (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Caroline Arscott



terra foundation for american art visiting professor

"Flesh Jubilation": Eros in the Art of the Sixties

Tuesday 3 November 2009

17.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Jonathan Katz (Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professor; and Associate Professor and Chair, Visual Studies Doctoral Program, University at Buffalo)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Mignon Nixon

Further information: This lecture explores why in the art world of the late 50s and 60s, before difference was particularized, specified, embodied, and made over into artistic identity, a single, universal human capacity-Eros--was elevated to determining status and made ground for a global politic of social liberation. This Eros was specifically not genital nor sexual pleasure, but rather, as defined by the influential Herbert Marcuse, something more akin to Freudian notions of polymorphous perversity. Invoked as solvent to the Cold War's containment culture and its multiple repressions, the liberatory potential of Eros as a mechanism of comprehensive social dissent turned precisely on its presumed communal and collective capacity to free the mind through a return to the body and its pleasures. For a few short years, a diverse group of artists, female and male, queer and straight, as different as Richard Hamilton, Lygia Clark, Franz West, Andy Warhol, Yoko Ono and Carolee Schneemann produced an art that, in politicizing the body while obfuscating its signs of differentiation, paradoxically engendered the very specific contemporary social categories like feminist and queer that now obscure Eros' formative and foundational role.

Jonathan D. Katz, a scholar of post-war art and culture from the vantage point of sexuality, is an Associate Professor at the University at Buffalo, forthcoming director of its Doctoral Program in Visual Studies, as well Honorary Research Faculty at the University of Manchester, and Guest Curator at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. Well known as an activist academic, Katz was the founding director of the Larry Kramer Initiative for Lesbian and Gay Studies at Yale University – the first queer studies programme in the Ivy League – and founding chair of the very first Department of Lesbian and Gay Studies in the United States, at City College of San Francisco. Katz is curator of a groundbreaking exhibition entitled Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture, opening 22 October 2010 at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery as the first major queer art exhibition in US history. Katz is now completing the eponymous book to accompany the exhibition.

As Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professor at The Courtauld in autumn 2009, he will also lead a series of seminars on Eros and the 1960s as part of Professor Mignon Nixon's M.A. Special Option in the History of Art on 'Informed: Art, Sex, War, and Gender Politics since 1960'.

Funded by the Terra Foundation for American Art, this visiting professorship forms part of an initiative of the Terra Foundation that aims to internationalise the field of historical American art, including building a network of scholarly peers. The appointments are offered to scholars of American Art whose work plays a defining role in the disciplines of art and architectural history and conservation and who are willing to share their research with the Courtauld community.


For further information about the Terra Foundation for American Art and this initiative see www.terraamericanart.org



Terra Foundation for American Art logo







Research SEMINAR: renaissance

The Winged Phallus: Neoplatonism Popularized and the Venetian Reclining Nude

Wednesday 4 November 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Paul Holberton (art historian and Paul Holberton Publishing)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Susie Nash



LONDON ANCIENT HISTORY/ROMAN ART SEMINAR

Marble Mania: Sculptural Materiality and Roman Cyprus

Thursday 5 November 2009

16.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr Jane Fejfer (Copenhagen)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe, King's College London (sophie.lunn-rockliffe@kcl.ac.uk) and Peter Stewart, The Courtauld Institute of Art (peter.stewart@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: Supported by the Institute of Classical Studies, The Courtauld Institute of Art’s Research Forum and Royal Holloway University of London



CONFERENCE

Imaging Dogma, Picturing Belief: Late-Medieval Mural Painting in Parish Churches across Europe

Friday 6 – Saturday 7 November 2009

12.00 - 18.15, 6 November (registration from 11.30)

10.00 - 18.15, 7 November (registration from 09.30)

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

San Vittore del Lazio, San Nicola, aisle
San Vittore del Lazio, San Nicola, aisle (Photo: F. Botana)

Speaker(s): include Joanne Anderson (University of Warwick), Milena Bartlová (Masaryk University, Brno), Axel Bolvig (University of Copenhagen), Federico Botana (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Dušan Buran (National Gallery, Bratislava), Tiziana Franco (University of Verona), Ilona Hans-Collas (Groupe des Recherches sur la Peinture Murale, Paris), Melena Hope (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Zsombor Jékely (Museum of Applied Arts, Budapest), Lisa Mahoney (Northwestern University, Chicago), Santiago Manzarbeitia Valle (Universidad Complutense, Madrid), Richard Marks (University of Cambridge), Tom Nickson (University of York), Luis Urbano Alfonso (University of Lisbon), Christian Nikolaus Opitz (University of Vienna), David Park (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Dominique Rigaux (University of Grenoble 2), Elena Taddia (independent scholar), Géraldine Victoir (Courtauld Institute), Lucy Wrapson (University of Cambridge).

Ticket/entry details: £25 (£15 concessions) Please send a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Co-ordinator, Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, clearly stating that you wish to book for the conference ‘Imaging Dogma, Picturing Belief.’ For credit card bookings call 020 7848 2785/2909. For further information, send an e-mail to ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by: Federico Botana

Further information: The walls of parish churches and chapels have much to tell us about life in the Middle Ages. Images of saints, votive frescoes, and graffiti are all witnesses of personal and collective histories; they contain gripping evidence of famines, epidemics, and puerperal and child mortality, and often reflect a deep anxiety about the afterlife. Mural programmes consisting of didactic subjects and biblical scenes can verify the strategies used by the clergy and other elites to instruct lay populations believed to be prone to heresy and to influence their views on issues such as wars and local feuds. At this conference, research on late-medieval mural painting in parish churches across Europe will be presented by scholars from thirteen different European countries and the United States.

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LONDON seminar for early modern visual culture

Reading Group

Monday 9 November 2009 Being postponed

18.00, Research Forum South Room

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Rose Marie San Juan (r.sanjuan@ucl.ac.uk) and Joanna Woodall (joanna.woodall@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: Texts to be announced as soon as available
This seminar series has been organised jointly by The Courtauld Institute of Art's Research Forum and University College London



CONFERENCE in honour of jennifer fletcher

Wednesday 11 November 2009

11.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Vittore Carpaccio, 'The Virgin reading to Christ', around 1490. Drawing in red chalk, pen and ink on paper
Vittore Carpaccio (1460/6 -1525/6), The Virgin reading to Christ, around 1490. Red chalk, pen and ink on paper, 12.8 x 9.4 cm. © The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London (D.1978.PG.82, verso)

Speaker(s): include Amanda Beddington (independent), Zahira Veliz Bomford (The Courtauld), Caroline Campbell (The Courtauld Gallery), Lorne Campbell (The National Gallery), David Chambers (The Warburg Institute), Peter Cherry (Trinity College, Dublin), Susan Connell (Independent), Jill Dunkerton (The National Gallery), Gabriele Finaldi (Museo del Prado), John Gash (Aberdeen University), Maurice Howard (University of Sussex), Susan Jenkins (English Heritage), Laura and Giulio Lepschy (University College, London), Neil Macgregor (The British Museum), Allegra Pesenti (The Hammer Museum), Catherine Reynolds (Christies), Xavier Salomon (Dulwich Picture Gallery) and Desmond Shawe-Taylor (The Royal Collection)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Caroline Campbell (The Courtauld Gallery), Dr Xavier Salomon (Dulwich Picture Gallery) and Dr Susan Ghosh (independent)

Further information: This one-day conference will celebrate Jennifer Fletcher’s outstanding contribution to art history as an imaginative and original scholar and inspirational teacher.

Jennifer came to The Courtauld as a student in 1957 and was supervised by Ernst Gombrich at the Warburg Institute. She is recognised today as one of the leading experts in Venetian Renaissance painting. However, after teaching at the University of Reading from 1960-66, she was first appointed as the Baroque specialist at The Courtauld. She was Slade Professor of Fine Art at the University of Oxford in 1990-91 and The Getty Museum Scholar in Los Angeles in 2000. She retired from The Courtauld in 2002, and is now an Honorary Fellow.

Very many of her students have gone on to become highly distinguished art historians in an extremely broad field. The speakers at the conference reflect Jennifer’s wide range of interests, including Rubens, the Baroque and Spain, as well as Renaissance Venice. Jennifer’s flair as a teacher lay in spotting talent and allowing her students to do what they were good at, having the faith and generosity to let them run with what they found inspirational. Jennifer’s sharp intellect, indomitable spirit, forthright manner and keen sense of justice have won her many admirers and friends over her long and varied career. The conference will pay tribute to the many highlights of her distinguished life as a scholar.

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Research SEMINAR: MEDieval work in progress

The Jaharis Gospel Lectionary: A Manuscript for St Sophia?

Thursday 12 November 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room (room tbc)

Speaker(s): John Lowden (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor John Lowden

Further information: The seminar will be followed by a book launch: The Jaharis Gospel Lectionary, Metropolitan Museum of Art/Yale University Press



CONFERENCE

Writing Art History: Reading and Writing

Friday 13 – Saturday 14 November 2009

14.30 - 18.00, 13 November (registration from 14.00)

10.00 - 18.00, 14 November (registration from 09.30)

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Peter Foldes' portrait of Professor Anthony Blunt reading, 1947
Peter Foldes, Portrait of Professor Anthony Blunt reading, 1947. Oil on canvas 61cm x 50.8cm. © The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London

Speaker(s): Nicholas Chare (University of Reading), Charlotte de Mille (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Linda Goddard (University of St. Andrews), Olivia Horsfall-Turner (University College London), Philippa Kaina (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Jeremy Melius (University of California at Berkeley), Maria Mileeva (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Charles F. B. Miller (University of Manchester), Gavin Parkinson (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Barbara Penner (Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL) Stephanie Porras (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, places are free but must be booked in advance. Please make a booking by emailing ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk by midday Wednesday 11 November 2009

Organised by: Lucy Bradnock and Catherine Grant

Further information: This conference marks the culmination of the activities of the Writing Art History Seminar Group, which has been meeting regularly for the past two years to discuss and develop projects that engage with the issues surrounding the act of writing, in relation to the artist, critic and historian. The various projects of its members have considered different modes and methods of writing, the relation between fiction and art history, the changing role of the art historian and critic, and the functions of names and anonymity, the boundaries and borders that shape the discipline.

The conference presents the work of a number of the group’s members, both emerging and established scholars, alongside the voices of some of those that have shaped the discipline through their own varied approaches and methodological explorations. It brings together some of the most significant voices in art history today, asking vital questions about the relationship of art, art writing and writing art history.

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Research SEMINAR: MODERN AND CONTEMpoRARy

Agnes Martin and the Sexuality of Abstraction

Monday 16 November 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Jonathan Katz (Terra Foundation for American Art Visiting Professor, The Courtauld; and Associate Professor and Chair, Visual Studies Doctoral Program, University at Buffalo)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Caroline Arscott
Further information: The palpable disconnect between the rigidly formal terms of Agnes Martin’s art and her metaphysical pronouncements about it has generally been met with an embarrassed silence. While some, such as Krauss, have sought to recuperate her metaphysics in art historical terms through (equally mystical) phenomenological accounts of the work, a few have sought to historicise and contextualise the turn towards metaphysics. As an interest in Zen was hardly unique to Martin in this period, a broader art historical accounting is clearly called for and queer studies offers a powerful tool for understanding the metaphysical flavour, not only of Martin’s oeuvre, but that of her contemporaries like Cage as well.

Jonathan D. Katz, a scholar of post-war art and culture from the vantage point of sexuality, is an Associate Professor at the University at Buffalo, forthcoming director of its Doctoral Program in Visual Studies, as well Honorary Research Faculty at the University of Manchester, Terra Visiting Professor at The Courtauld Institute of Art and Guest Curator at the Smithsonian's National Portrait Gallery. Well known as an activist academic, Katz was the founding director of the Larry Kramer Initiative for Lesbian and Gay Studies at Yale University – the first queer studies programme in the Ivy League – and founding chair of the very first Department of Lesbian and Gay Studies in the United States, at City College of San Francisco. Katz is curator of a groundbreaking exhibition entitled Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture, opening 22 October 2010 at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery as the first major queer art exhibition in US history. Katz is now completing the eponymous book to accompany the exhibition.





LONDON ANCIENT HISTORY/ROMAN ART SEMINAR

Still Life in Stone? Roman Triumph and Barbarian Defeat on the Pedestal Reliefs of Trajan's Column

Thursday 19 November 2009

16.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Dr Jon Coulston (University of St Andrews)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe, King's College London (sophie.lunn-rockliffe@kcl.ac.uk) and Peter Stewart, The Courtauld Institute of Art (peter.stewart@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: Supported by the Institute of Classical Studies, The Courtauld Institute of Art’s Research Forum and Royal Holloway University of London



Inaugural early modern symposium

Everyday Objects: Art and Experience in Early Modern Europe

Saturday 21 November 2009

10.00 - 17.20, Research Forum South Room (with registration from 09.30)

Diego Velázquez, Christ in the House of Martha and Mary, c. 1618 showing kitchen scene and Christ through window in adjacent roomDiego Velázquez, Christ in the House of Martha and Mary, c. 1618. Photo: © National Gallery, London

Speaker(s): Samuel Bibby (University College London), Ariane Fennetaux (Université Paris-Diderot), Olivia Fryman (Kingston University and Historic Royal Palaces), Melinda Rabb (Brown University), Paula Radisich (Whittier College), Katie Scott (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Beth Fowkes Tobin (Arizona State University), Joanna Woodall (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: £15 (£10 Students) Please send a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Co-ordinator, Research Forum, The Courtauld Institute of Art , Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, clearly stating that you wish to book for the ‘Everyday Objects Conference’. For credit card bookings call 020 7848 2785/2909. For further information, send an email to ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by: Edward Payne and  Hannah Williams

Further information: Through a focus on the everyday object, this one-day symposium explores both the experience of visual culture in everyday life and the phenomenon of the everyday in visual culture. Drawing on theories of the everyday from such fields as anthropology, phenomenology and sociology, papers will examine the seemingly banal things that formed the culture of daily life, asking: what constitutes an everyday object? How were everyday objects experienced, represented or collected? And how does their study enhance our understanding of the cultural history of early modernity?

Papers by established and emerging scholars will explore the theme of the everyday object in a variety of media, including sculpture, painting, dress, furniture and the graphic arts. Presentations will investigate ephemeral objects, quotidian spaces and habitual activities – from the social rituals of marriage, food consumption and waste disposal, to overlooked ‘things’ like taxidermy, miniature furniture and clothing accessories.

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MEDieval art in theory workshop

Framing the Middle Ages: Concepts of the Frame in Medieval Art and Architecture

Monday 23 November 2009

14.00 - 18.00, Research Forum South Room

Auxerre Cathedral: religious scenes on wall
Auxerre Cathedral. Photo: Stuart Whatling

Speaker(s): Peter Bokody (Central European University, Budapest), Meredith Cohen (Department of Art History, University of Oxford), David Humphrey (Royal College of Art), Cynthia Johnston (Keble College, Oxford), Anne Moignet-Gaultier (Université Paris 10), John Renner (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Hanna Wimmer (Warburg Institute)

Ticket/entry details: Please note that this event has proved to be very popular and unfortunately as we have limited space we cannot take any further bookings. For further information and to book please contact Laura Cleaver (laura.cleaver@courtauld.ac.uk)

Organised by: Laura Cleaver

Further information: From the mid-twentieth century notions surrounding framing devices and their hermeneutical, epistemological and ontological functions have been explored in many disciplines. The word 'frame' has been applied in a range of contexts, from literary theory to neuroscience. The common feature of all its meanings, however, has been that the frame in some way contextualises the framed, guiding the viewer/reader towards a particular understanding of its contents.

This workshop will explore the significance of concepts of frames and framing for the understanding of medieval art and architecture. It will address how images and architecture are 'framed', and consider how artists and architects used 'frames' of many kinds in their work. The participants will present short papers on a diverse range of objects, made between c.700 and-c.1500, and the sessions are designed to stimulate debate and discussion.

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FRANk davis memorial lecture series

Globalisation and Contemporary Art: Performing Bare Life, Exploring Carceral Cultures

Tuesday 24 November 2009

17.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Coco Fusco performance 'A Room of One's Own', 2008 - in army uniform saluting with USA flag behind her
Coco Fusco, A Room of One's Own, performance 2008 Whitney Biennial. Image courtesy of Eduardo Aparicio

Speaker(s): Coco Fusco (interdisciplinary artist, writer and Director of Intermedia Initiatives, Parsons The New School for Design, New York)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Julian Stallabrass (The Courtauld) and Professor Malcolm Bull (University of Oxford)

Further information: Coco Fusco will discuss her latest body of work in video, performance, and writing that investigates military interrogation as intercultural performance. She will also discuss her two new projects: one that looks at the "techniques of the body" that constitute daily routines in American prisons and the other, which will focus on the various Black Codes that were instituted by the US and former European colonial powers to delimit the rights of free blacks during slavery and all black peoples in the New World after slavery.

Fusco’s work combines electronic media and performance in a variety of formats, from staged multi-media performances incorporating large scale projections and closed circuit television to live performances streamed to the internet that invite audiences to chart the course of action through chat interaction. Her most recent work deals with the role of female interrogators in the War on Terror. Those works include Operation Atropos (a film about interrogation training), and A Room of One’s Own (a monologue about female interrogators). As mentioned above, Fusco is currently developing a new performance that explores the “Black Codes” that were established in the Americas after slavery for the 2010 World Congress of the International Drama/Theatre Education Association in Brazil.

She has performed, lectured, exhibited and curated around the world since 1988. She is a recipient of a 2003 Herb Alpert Award in the Arts. Fusco's performances and videos have been included in two Whitney Biennials (2008 and 1993), the Sydney Biennale, The Johannesburg Biennial, The Kwangju Biennale, The Shanghai Biennale, InSite O5, Transmediale, The London International Theatre Festival, VideoBrasil and Performa05. She is the author of English is Broken Here: Notes on Cultural Fusion in the Americas (1995), The Bodies that Were Not Ours and Other Writings (2001), and A Field Guide for Female Interrogators (2008). She is also the editor of Corpus Delecti: Performance Art of the Americas (1999) and Only Skin Deep: Changing Visions of the American Self (2003).

Contemporary art has been radically transformed by globalisation. Biennials sprang up across the world from Korea to Senegal to Brazil, showcasing globalised contemporary art, and inculcating its values in diverse local situations. At the same time, that art was altered as artists from the ‘developing world’, particularly China, India, Latin American and Sub-Saharan Africa, rose to prominence on the global art scene. While much of the art that first came out of that transformation propagandised the virtues of globalisation, new tensions have emerged, from the ‘war on terror’ to the financial crisis, which have led to a strongly documentary and politicised turn in art. In this series, prominent art historians, artists and theorists will examine this striking new configuration. This series has been organised in conjunction with the Research Forum/Andrew W Mellon Foundation M.A. Special Option in the History of Art on ‘Aestheticising Politics? The Political in Globalised Contemporary Art’.

Sponsored by the FM Kirby Foundation



Research SEMINAR: Renaissance

Reconsidering the Nude: Northern Tradition and Venetian Innovation

Wednesday 25 November 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Paula Nuttall (Victoria & Albert Museum)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Susie Nash



LONDON ANCIENT HISTORY/ROMAN ART SEMINAR

Living with Myths in Pompeii and Beyond

Thursday 26 November 2009

16.30, Research Forum South (room tbc)

Speaker(s): Professor Paul Zanker (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe, King's College London (sophie.lunn-rockliffe@kcl.ac.uk) and Peter Stewart, The Courtauld Institute of Art (peter.stewart@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: Supported by the Institute of Classical Studies, The Courtauld Institute of Art’s Research Forum and Royal Holloway University of London




CONFERENCE

Surrealism, Post-War Theory and the Avant-Garde

Friday 27 – Saturday 28 November 2009

17.15 - 19.00, 27 November

10.00 - 18.30, 28 November (with registration from 9.30)

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

front cover of Tel Quel journal no. 46

Speaker(s): Lucy Bradnock (Getty Research Institute), David Cunningham (University of Westminster), Jonathan Eburne (Pennsylvania State University), Jill Fenton (Queen Mary, University of London), Patrick ffrench (Kings College, University of London), Steven Harris (University of Alberta, Edmonton), Alyce Mahon (Trinity College, Cambridge), Gavin Parkinson (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Michael Richardson (independent scholar) and Allan Stoekl (Pennsylvania State University)

Ticket/entry details: £10. Please send a cheque made payable to ‘Courtauld Institute of Art’ to: Research Forum Events Coordinator, The Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN, clearly stating that you wish to book for the ‘Surrealism, Post-War Theory and the Avant-Garde conference’. Or call 020 7848 2785/2909 to make a credit card booking. Or, for further information, send an email to ResearchForumEvents@courtauld.ac.uk

Organised by: Gavin Parkinson (The Courtauld Institute of Art) in association with Dr David Cunningham (University of Westminster)

Further information: This conference co-organised with the Institute for Modern and Contemporary Culture at the University of Westminster engages with a range of different legacies of Surrealism in the postwar era, both in philosophical and theoretical work and in the activities of various avant-garde movements, including existentialism, performance, Pop Art, COBRA, the Nouveau Roman, Tel Quel, the Situationist International, post-structuralism, and postmodernism. The contributors to the event will explore both the often occluded role of Surrealism within the formation of 1960s-1970s French theory and its place within an emergent post-war discourse of the avant-garde.

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Research SEMINAR: MODERN AND CONTEMpoRARy

The Artist According to Alighiero E Boetti

Monday 30 November 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Mark Godfrey (Tate Modern)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Caroline Arscott



LONDON seminar for early modern visual culture

History and the Matter of Holiness

Monday 30 November 2009

18.00, Seminar Room 4

Speaker(s): Professor Helen Hills (York University)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Rose Marie San Juan (r.sanjuan@ucl.ac.uk) and Joanna Woodall (joanna.woodall@courtauld.ac.uk)

Further information: This seminar series has been organised jointly by The Courtauld Institute of Art's Research Forum and University College London



DECEMBER

FRANk davis memorial lecture series

Globalisation and Contemporary Art: Unconcerned But Not Indifferent

Tuesday 1 December 2009

17.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

men with eyes and right hands bandaged - Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin's 'Afterlife' 2009
Afterlife 1
, Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin (after Jahangir Razmi), 2009. Courtesy The Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg

Speaker(s): Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin (artists)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Julian Stallabrass (The Courtauld) and Professor Malcolm Bull (University of Oxford)

Further information: Broomberg and Chanarin have collaborated for over a decade, during which time they have  been pre-occupied with the role of representation in places of trauma and conflict. Here they talk about their recent work made in Israel and Palestine, Iraq, Afghanistan and most recently in Iran.

For further information about artists Broomberg and Chanarin, please see their website: www.choppedliver.info

Contemporary art has been radically transformed by globalisation. Biennials sprang up across the world from Korea to Senegal to Brazil, showcasing globalised contemporary art, and inculcating its values in diverse local situations. At the same time, that art was altered as artists from the ‘developing world’, particularly China, India, Latin American and Sub-Saharan Africa, rose to prominence on the global art scene. While much of the art that first came out of that transformation propagandised the virtues of globalisation, new tensions have emerged, from the ‘war on terror’ to the financial crisis, which have led to a strongly documentary and politicised turn in art. In this series, prominent art historians, artists and theorists will examine this striking new configuration. This series has been organised in conjunction with the Research Forum/Andrew W Mellon Foundation M.A. Special Option in the History of Art on ‘Aestheticising Politics? The Political in Globalised Contemporary Art’.

Sponsored by the FM Kirby Foundation



BACON AND DELEUZE

Wednesday 2 December 2009

17.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Right-hand panel (a figure on a stool) from Francis Bacon's 'Three Figures in a Room', 1964
Francis Bacon, Three Figures in a Room (right-hand panel), 1964. Oil on canvas, Centre Pompidou, Paris. © The Estate of Francis Bacon

Speaker(s): Martin Harrison (art historian and curator)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Further information: Giles Deleuze’s study of Francis Bacon (first published 1981) has long been considered a seminal work and has influenced much subsequent writing on Bacon. In this lecture, however, Martin Harrison questions aspects of Deleuze’s approach, critiquing in particular his understanding of the role of ‘the photograph’ and ‘chance’ in Bacon’s work.

Martin Harrison is a leading scholar of post-War British art and one of the foremost authorities on the work of Francis Bacon. He is the editor of the forthcoming Francis Bacon catalogue raisonne and of the forthcoming collection of essays, Francis Bacon: New Studies. His recent publications include, Francis Bacon: In Camera (2005) and Incunabula (2008). He was the curator of the exhibition Transition: The London Art Scene in the 1950s (Barbican 2002) and has contributed to the recent Francis Bacon exhibition at Tate (2008) and the current exhibition, Francis Bacon: A Terrible Beauty at the Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin.





Research SEMINAR: MEDieval work in progress

Cut, Pasted, and Cut Again: The Original Function and Later Collection of Early Prints in the Low Countries

Thursday 3 December 2009

17.30, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Kathryn Rudy (Caroline Villers Associate Fellow, The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor John Lowden



iNTERNATIONAL ADVISORY BOARD SEMINAR

Turner and the Masters: The Issue of Pairs

Monday, 7 December 2009

11.00 - 13.00, Research Forum South Room

Speaker(s): Neil Cox (University of Essex), Mark Hallett (University of York), Wendy Ikemoto (Terra Foundation for American Art Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow, The Courtauld), Stephanie Schwartz (Research Forum/Andrew W Mellon MA Postdoctoral Fellow, The Courtauld) and Barnaby Wright (Curator of 20th century Art, The Courtauld)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all Courtauld staff and students

Organised by: Caroline Arscott and Wendy Ikemoto

Further information: This panel will explore the Turner and the Masters exhibition at the Tate Britain through the idea of the pair.  Three Turner and old master pairs will be juxtaposed with three different pairs to highlight themes from the exhibition and the broader issues it raises: for example, methods of visualising art history and questions of influence, continuity, difference, tradition, and innovation.

The panel will be led by Wendy Ikemoto (Terra Foundation for American Art Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow) and will include: Board members Neil Cox (University of Essex) and Mark Hallett (University of York), with Barnaby Wright (Curator of 20th century Art, The Courtauld) and Stephanie Schwartz (Research Forum/Andrew W Mellon MA Postdoctoral Fellow, The Courtauld).




FRANk davis memorial lecture series

Globalisation and Contemporary Art: Everyday People

Tuesday 8 December 2009

17.30 - 18.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

installation of Thomas Hirschhorn's 'Universal Gym', 2009, with dummy wearing tracksuit and holding globe in her outstretched hand
Thomas Hirschhorn, Universal Gym, 2009. Installation view, Gladstone Gallery, New York. Photo: Anne Wagner

Speaker(s): Anne M. Wagner (Class of 1936 Chair and Professor of Modern and Contemporary Art, University of California, Berkeley)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Julian Stallabrass (The Courtauld) and Professor Malcolm Bull (University of Oxford)

Further information: "The proposition," declared Henri Lefebvre, "is to decode the modern world, that bloody riddle, according to the everyday." According, in other words, to the notion of a special category of experience: routinized yet not taking its marching orders from the rhythms of industrialized production, steeped in the ordinariness that life has when it falls through the cracks. This paper revisits Lefebvre's proposal, to ask whether the everyday still survives as a useful term. If so, how might it figure in contemporary visual representation? This paper suggests that some such set of questions have motivated a fairly wide range of recent artworks — most of them variations on the practice of portraiture — bringing with them the anxiety that everyday experience might well be a thing of the past.

Contemporary art has been radically transformed by globalisation. Biennials sprang up across the world from Korea to Senegal to Brazil, showcasing globalised contemporary art, and inculcating its values in diverse local situations. At the same time, that art was altered as artists from the ‘developing world’, particularly China, India, Latin American and Sub-Saharan Africa, rose to prominence on the global art scene. While much of the art that first came out of that transformation propagandised the virtues of globalisation, new tensions have emerged, from the ‘war on terror’ to the financial crisis, which have led to a strongly documentary and politicised turn in art. In this series, prominent art historians, artists and theorists will examine this striking new configuration. This series has been organised in conjunction with the Research Forum/Andrew W Mellon Foundation M.A. Special Option in the History of Art on ‘Aestheticising Politics? The Political in Globalised Contemporary Art’

Anne M. Wagner is an art historian who has published widely on nineteenth and twentieth century art. Since 1988, she has been a professor in the Department of History of Art at the University of California, Berkeley, where she holds the Class of 1936 Chair. Recent published essays include studies of Jasper Johns's Flag, Eva Hesse's titles, and Dan Flavin's spaces.  Her work has appeared in such journals as Artforum, Representations, October, and The Threepenny Review. Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux: Sculptor of the Second Empire, was published in 1986, and Three Artists (Three Women) in 1996. In 2005, her third book, Mother Stone: The Vitality of Modern British Sculpture, came out from Yale University Press. She is currently putting the finishing touches on a book of her essays titled A House Divided: On Recent American Art.  A second book-in-progress is Behaving Globally, which has been commissioned by Princeton University Press for a new series called Essays on the Arts.

Sponsored by the FM Kirby Foundation



CONFERENCE

‘Gothic’ and its Legacies

Thursday 10 December 2009

11.00 - 18.00, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Nineteenth Century painting of lady wearing crown and medieval dress, in Notre Dame Cathedral
Nineteenth-century painting in Notre-Dame Cathedral, Paris. Photo: L Cleaver.

Speaker(s): Laura Cleaver (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Camelia Darie (University of Manchester), Charlotte de Mille (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Niamh Nic Ghabhann (Trinity College, Dublin), Jeong-yon Ha (University of Edinburgh), Owen Hopkins (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Ayla Lepine (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Anne Moignet-Gaultier (Université Paris 10), Peter Nelson Lindfield (University of St Andrews), Niccola Shearman (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Gilda Williams (Open University), Matthew Woodworth (Duke University)

Ticket/entry details: All welcome but numbers are limited. Advance booking by 7 December 2009 is essential. To register and for further information contact Laura Cleaver at Laura.cleaver@courtauld.ac.uk.

Organised by: Laura Cleaver and Ayla Lepine

Further information: Giorgio Vasari, writing in the sixteenth century, famously associated what he saw as a decline in the arts of painting, sculpture and architecture with the invasion of Rome by ‘Goths and other barbarians’.  Just what constitutes ‘Gothic’ art, however, remains contentious.  In the nineteenth century John Ruskin was amongst those who explored the meaning of the term, seeking to define the ‘Gothicness’ of medieval works.  Unlike Vasari, however, Ruskin celebrated this quality and advocated the use of this ‘Gothic’ style by contemporary artists and architects.

In the centuries after the Middle Ages are usually considered to have ended, works of art and architecture from the period continued to be used as inspiration for works in a wide range of media.  At the same time, surviving material was sometimes reworked under the guises of conservation or improvement.  This workshop will explore such responses to the art of the Middle Ages in works of art and architecture produced after 1550.

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