Zolt Asta: 'Fired but unexploded'.....before and after


Wednesday 22 April 2015

11.30, Research Forum Seminar Room

ochre coloured bomb with caption Fired but Unexploded
Zolt Asta, Fired but Unexploded, 2013

Speaker(s): Zolt Asta (artist)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission
Organiser(s):
Professor Sarah Wilson and Dr Klara Kemp-Welch

Zolt Asta (aka Zsolt Asztalaos) is an artist born 1974 in Budapest. From 1993-2000 he studied at the Hungarian Academy of Fine Arts in Budapest, finally turning from painting as a practice to conceptual art. It was this ‘turn’ and his painterly eye that caught Sarah Wilson’s attention when he represented Hungary in its gilded  and mosaic-studded pavilion by Géza Maróti, at  the 55th Biennale in Venice in 2013 (curator Gábor Gulyás). ‘Fired but unexploded’ comprised twenty videos, each presenting an unexploded projectile found in Hungary.....read more



Terra Foundation for American Art Postdoctoral Fellow Lecture

American Nights: The Nocturne in American Art and Visual Culture, 1890-1917

Thursday, 23 April 2015

18.00, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Brooklyn Bridge over river at evening, with buildings in the foreground
Ernest Lawson, Brooklyn Bridge, 1917-20. Oil on canvas. Image: 20 3/8 x 24 in. (51.80 x 61 cm). Frame: 28 x 31 1/2 in. (71.1 x 80 cm). Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1992.43



Speaker(s): Hélène Valance (Terra Foundation for American Art Postdoctoral Fellow, The Courtauld)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

American Nights explores the fascination turn-of-the-20th-century artists and their audiences felt for landscapes of the night, interrogating not only artistic practices, but also the value of night as a visual metaphor in the culture of the time. Hélène Valance thus analyses the nocturnes as a response to the technological, scientific, political and socio-economic changes that affected the period, arguing they were an ambivalent reaction that blended both rejection and acceptance of modernity. This study shows how James McNeill Whistler’s formula of the “nocturne” landscape became captivating for late 19th-century audiences, at a moment when electric lighting, but also.....read more



William Fagg and the study of African Art

14.00 – 18.00, Friday 24 April 2015 (with registration from 13.30)
09.30 – 17.30, Saturday 25 April 2015 (with registration from 09.00)

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

William Fagg Sculpture by Olowe of Ise, courtesy of the Royal Anthropological Institute.

Speakers: Professor Rowland Abioudun (Amherst College), Professor Sidney Kasfir (Emory University), Professor Elizabeth Harney (University....
Ticket/entry details:£26 (£16 students, Courtauld staff/students and concessions) Online booking for this event is now closed. Tickets are available on registration (payment by cash or cheque only).
Organised by:
 Professors Christopher Green and Deborah Swallow with Cathy Corbett (Courtauld Institute of Art), Professor John Picton (formerly of SOAS and the British Museum) and Professor John Mack (UEA and formerly of the British Museum)  in collaboration with the Royal Anthropological Institute

William Fagg was the great pioneer in Britain of the study of art in Africa. His interests ranged across all regions of the continent, and through all periods and forms. In his capacity as the leading authority on the subject at the ......read more



Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland Annual Lecture 2015

Evidence Set in Stone? Twelfth-century Sculptors and Workshop Practices in Northern Palencia, Spain

Tuesday, 28 April 2015

17.30, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Stone carving which includes an image of the sculptor Micaelis at work with hammer and chisel
Self-portrait of the sculptor Micaelis from the church of Revilla de Santullan. Photo: Tessa Garton

Speaker(s): Tessa Garton (Professor Emerita, College of Charleston, South Carolina)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: The Courtauld Institute of Art in collaboration with the Corpus of Romanesque Sculpture in Britain and Ireland (CRSBI)

The northern region of Palencia, close to the pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela, contains a remarkable number of well-preserved and richly carved Romanesque churches, concentrated in the region around Aguilar de Campoo, and close to quarries with excellent quality stone for sculpture. The repetition of similar designs at many different locations suggests a system of professional production by a workshop engaged on multiple commissions, and the mass-production of standard motifs.  Signatures and inscriptions provide evidence of the increasingly professional status of sculptors.....read more



Research seminar: Medieval work in Progress

Mnemonic Use and Social Agency: A Sinai Icon of the Last Judgement

Wednesday, 29 April 2015

17.30, Research Forum Seminar Room

Speaker(s): Niamh Bhalla (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Tom Nickson

The image of the Last Judgement was executed in Byzantium for the impact that it was thought to have in the lives of individuals and communities. The mnemonic use of the image of the Last Judgement formed a large part of the social agency of these images. The funerary and commemorative contexts of many Last Judgement images necessarily implicated them in memorial practices. The image was itself also specifically designed to prompt and facilitate memory. On a simplistic level, it occasioned the.....read more



Giotto's Circle Presents Berlin Remixed: Papers on Italian Art from the RSA Conference

Symposium

Thursday, 30 April 2015

10.00 - 18.00, Research Forum Seminar Room

Members of Giotto’s circle viewing an exhibition
Members of Giotto’s circle viewing an exhibition




Speaker(s): include: Bryony Bartlett-Rawlings (The Courtauld); Federico Botana (Queen Mary, University of London); Joanna Cannon (The Courtauld); Caroline Campbell (National Gallery); Donal Cooper........

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Joanna Cannon

This informal event is an opportunity for speakers who attended RSA, and who are connected with The Courtauld and/or with Giotto’s Circle, to hear each other’s presentations, and to present their papers in different combinations, beyond the original sessions for which they were prepared. The event aims to stimulate.....read more



Addressing images iii

Brown Bag Discussion Group

Friday, 1 May, 2015

12.30 - 14.00, Research Forum South Room

 

women and fashion
Collage image by Alexis Romano
Speaker(s):
Dr Rebecca Arnold (Oak Foundation Lecturer in History of Dress & Textiles, The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission. Places are limited so advance booking is required. BOOK ONLINE

Organised by: Dr Rebecca Arnold


This series of once-termly brown bag events opens up discussion of dress’ significance within imagery – whether paintings, prints, photographs, advertisements, film stills or drawings. It brings together dress and art historians, as well as those interested in exploring issues and meanings within representation.  A single image will .....read more



research seminar: history of photography

Claude Cahun’s Photographic Self-Portraits: Staging the Self and the Aesthetics of Resistance

Tuesday, 5 May 2015

17.30, Research Forum Seminar Room

Claude Cahun with neckerchief, rouged cheeks, kiss curls and musical instrument (?)
Claude Cahun (1894-1954), Self-portrait (ca. 1927 (detail)). © Yale University Library Visual Resources Collection




Speaker(s): Dr Liena Vayzman (Assistant Professor of Fine Arts, LaGuardia Community College, City University of New York)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Yasmin Amaratunga and Professor Julian Stallabrass (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Androgyne, rag doll, Buddha, Devil, Medusa, magician of the self – French Surrealist artist, writer and activist Claude Cahun (1894-1954) played all these roles in her enigmatic photographs. Cahun’s photographic self-images and photomontages, at times made in collaboration with her partner Marcel Moore, destabilize fixed notions of identity especially in terms of gender, sexuality, and religion through performance and staging.....read more



Research seminar:
Renaissance

Crafting the Past: The Making and Reception of Renaissance Pastiches, 1890 - 1914

Wednesday, 6 May 2015 CANCELLED

17.30, Research Forum Seminar Room

Speaker(s): Dr Flaminia Gennari (Syracuse University Florence)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Guido Rebecchini

Pastiches are objects that combine elements of the past in new compositions. At the turn of the Twentieth Century the making and marketing of pseudo-Renaissance artifacts were a veritable aesthetic and a thriving international industry. Pastiches were created to offer the modern beholder with something that fully expressed his or her ideas of the past. Today museums' collections are filled with pastiches that are neither forgeries nor “authentic” and that raise a wide range of interpretive and conservation issues.....read more



Leonardo da Vinci Society Annual Lecture 2015

Leonardo, Luca Pacioli and the Venetian optic c.1480-1510

Friday, 8 May 2015

18.00 - 19.00, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Luca Pacioli with books and geometrical drawings and objects
Attributed to Jacopo de' Barbari, Portrait of Luca Pacioli, c. 1495-1500, Tempera on panel, Capodimonte Museum, Naples, Public domain image from Wikipedia.org



Speaker(s): Professor Paul Hills (Professor Emeritus of Renaissance Art, The Courtauld institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Francis Ames-Lewis (Birkbeck)

Venetian painting around 1500 is marked by a distinctive geometry and a special regard for light. This may be explained, in part, by the repeated presence in Venice of the mathematician and friend of Leonardo, Luca Pacioli. Less concerned with linear perspective as a system for delineating a recessional space than with the construction of complex regular bodies, Pacioli’s teaching stressed proportion and interval. Carpaccio, Giovanni Bellini and the young Giorgione were receptive to this Paciolian culture of ‘divine proportion’. By attending to the Venetians’ pictorial construction of reflections and shadows we.....read more



Third Annual Renaissance Postgraduate Symposium

Between Heaven and Earth: Ecclesiastical Patronage in Europe, 1400-1600

10.00 – 17.30, Saturday 9 May 2015 (with registration from 09.30)

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

renaissance sympScenes from the Life of a Bishop, panel 1 (detail). Before c. 1520. Master of the von Groote Adoration  © The Courtauld Institute of  Art

Speakers: see programme

Ticket/entry details: Free and open to all with ADVANCE BOOKING required

Organised by: Joost Joustra and Lydia Hansell (The Courtauld Institute of Art)


In recent years, the artistic commissions of ecclesiastic and lay patrons – both individual and collective – have been a fruitful area of scholarship. Research addressing issues of sacred space, devotional practice, and the materiality of extant objects has generated new insights into the artistic provisions made for patronal .....read more





Research seminar: Early Modern

Urbanities and Strategies of Public Space:

Exile in the City: the Duc de Chartres, the Fronde des Princes and the Politics of the Garden of Monceau, 1771 - 1781

Monday, 11 May 2015

18.00, Research Forum Seminar Room

Speaker(s): Gabriel Wick (Queen Mary, University of London)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Sussan Babaie and Camillia Pietrabissa

In April 1771 the Princes of the Blood, cousins of the king and key figures in the absolutist regime, quit Versailles in protest at Louis XV's repression of the Parlements. This self-imposed exile was intended to demonstrate to the public and the government the princes' dismay at the crown's policies and their support for the nascent party of opposition -- the partie patriote. The most enthusiastic of the princely exiles was the duc de Chartres -- mercurial, phenomenally rich, and dangerously unemployed. This heir to the.....read more




Research Forum Visiting Professor Lecture

The Back of the Painted Beyond

Tuesday, 12 May 2015

17.30 - 18.45, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Speaker(s): Michael Ann Holly (Robert Sterling Clark Visiting Professor, Williams College; and Starr Director Emeritus of the Research and Academic Program, Clark Art Institute)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission, first-come-first-served

This talk will be devoted to the enchantments of faraway and distant backgrounds in early modern Northern paintings. Foregrounds typically tell stories; backgrounds open onto other more invisible realms. Where do vanishing points go when they vanish? What lies beyond? There has been much speculation of late about “animate” art. Might painted backgrounds contribute to this new phenomenological awareness? Works of art by Patinir, Aertsen, van Eyck, Elsheimer, and Breughel, among others, will be addressed in the attempt to give words to the allure of the painted beyond.....read more



Research seminar: Medieval work in Progress

Tondino di Guerrino and Family: A Sienese Goldsmithing Dynasty of the Trecento

Wednesday, 13 May /2015

17.30, Research Forum Seminar Room

Chalice decorated with Christ on the cross, other holy figures and, birds in  blue, white and brown
Chalice (detail) by Tondino di Guerrino and Andrea Riguardi, Siena, 1315-25, h. 20.9cm, silver-gilt with translucent and champlevé enamels, British Museum, inv. no. 1960,1203.1.


Speaker(s): Glyn Davies (Curator, Sculpture section, Victoria and Albert Museum)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Tom Nickson

During the fourteenth century, Siena achieved a European pre-eminence in the field of goldsmiths’ work, even challenging the traditional supremacy of Paris for such luxury items. Unusually, many of the key Sienese goldsmiths are known by name, several with a number of attributable surviving works. This has allowed for a type of ‘personality’-based art history that is unusual in media other than painting and sculpture. Research over the last century has gradually identified one Sienese family as of the greatest importance.....read more



Dmitry Prigov Lecture Series

DAP and Russian Art Now

Friday, 15 May 2015

18.00, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

poem in Russian script on side of building
Public art installation of one of Dmitri Prigov’s concrete poems from the 1970s in the district of Belyaevo, Moscow, 2014

Speaker(s): Antonio Geusa (independent curator and author of the History of Russian Video Art vols. 1, 2, 3) and Dmitry Ozerkov (curator of the Hermitage 20/21 Project), moderated by Elizaveta Butakova (The Courtauld)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Elizaveta Butakova and Dr Maria Mileeva in conjunction with The Prigov Foundation and the Cambridge Courtauld Russian Art Centre (CCRAC). Sponsored by The Prigov Foundation and The Courtauld Institute of Art Research Forum.

Bringing together two key figures in the study and display of contemporary Russian art, this evening of short lectures followed by a panel discussion will pick up the thread following the recent major retrospective ‘From the Renaissance to Conceptualism and Beyond’ at the State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow to examine the profound impact of Dmitry Alexandrovich Prigov (DAP) on contemporary art in Russia.....read more



Women Make Fashion / Fashion makes Women

A Conference Celebrating 50 Years of Dress History at The Courtauld

Saturday, 16 May 2015

timings to be confirmed, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

a black and white photo of a woman in a cocktail dress walking down the runway Fashion Show, Barrett Street School, 1958. (Courtesy of the London College of Fashion Archives © (1958) The London College of Fashion.)

Keynote Speakers: Cheryl Buckley (University of Brighton) and Judith Clark (London College of Fashion)

Speakers: Dr Rebecca Arnold (Oak Foundation Lecturer in History of Dress & Textiles, The Courtauld), Elizabeth Kutesko (PhD candidate, The Courtauld), Dr Eugenie...

Ticket/entry details: £16 (£11 students, Courtauld staff/students and concessions) BOOKING NOW OPEN!

Organised by: Dr Rebecca Arnold (Oak Foundation Lecturer in History of Dress & Textiles, The Courtauld), Elizabeth Kutesko (PhD candidate, The Courtauld), and Lucy Moyse (PhD candidate, The Courtauld)

As part of our celebration of fifty years of History of Dress at The Courtauld, this one- day conference explores the relationship and significance of women in designing, wearing, promoting, curating and writing about dress and fashion. Speakers will consider this both from the perspective of those working professionally in ....read more



Research seminar: Renaissance

Into the Streets? Temporary Art Exhibitions in Early Modern Venice

Wednesday, 20 May 2015

17.30, Research Forum Seminar Room

Speaker(s): Dr Elsje van Kessel (University of St Andrews)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Guido Rebecchini

Early modern Venice had two annually returning temporary art exhibitions, one on the Piazza San Marco and one on the Campo San Rocco. As Giorgio Vasari attests, ‘the exhibition of the Ascension’ on the Piazza had already become common practice in the middle of the sixteenth century, and a wealth of other open air exhibitions, large and small, in the centre and in the neighbourhoods, were organised throughout the early modern period. Fleeting and elusive as these exhibitions were, art history has largely ignored them, and it is the purpose of my paper to assess what the study of such ephemeral practices.....read more



The Dissolution of Photography

Friday, 22 May 2015

18.00 - 20.00, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

Photo of woman’s face singing into microphone, image distressed by creases
Photo © Julian Stallabrass

Speaker(s): Jessica Barker (The Courtauld), Alexander Garcia Duttmann (University of the Arts, Berlin ), Olivier Richon (Royal College of Art), Julian Stallabrass (The  Courtauld)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professors Olivier Richon (Royal College of Art) and Julian Stallabrass (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Today, photography is commonly understood to be in a post-medium age; chemical photography has been superseded by digital means, and the photographic industry now has little use for film-based photographic work. Images circulate in their digital form and the screen of the computer or the phone is the most common way of apprehending still and moving images. Are we moving towards an increasing dematerialisation of the photographic image that has dissolved its physicality? Has the communication and information value.....read more



Research seminar: Medieval work in Progress

Specimen, Surgeon, Speculum, Self. The Weirdest Portrait in Medieval England

Wednesday, 27 May 2015

17.30, Research Forum Seminar Room

Speaker(s): Dr Jack Hartnell (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Tom Nickson

Portraiture, in the sense that we understand it today, is a difficult idea to get to grips with in the material of the pre-modern world. In the Middle Ages in particular, notions of the individual and the corporate often collided, and it can be difficult for the historian to unpick the network of links between portrait and personification, as well as between spiritual and corporeal personhood. But building on recent significant strides forward in understanding the medieval history of the genre, this paper seeks to bring the portraiture.....read more



Crash and Burn: Destruction in American Art

Conference

Friday 5 June 2015, 13.30 - 19.00 (with registration from 13.00)

Saturday 6 June 2015, 10.30 - 17.30 (with registration from 10.00)

Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre

The Courtauld Institute of Art, Somerset House, Strand, London WC2R 0RN

Small human figures react to bursting shell, spray of debris, colour, light
Claggett Wilson
, Flower of Death--The Bursting of a Heavy Shell--Not as It Looks, but as It Feels and Sounds and Smells, ca. 1919, watercolour and pencil on paperboard. © Smithsonian American Art Museum. Gift of Alice H. Rossin.

Speaker(s): Keynote: Wendy Bellion (University of Delaware). Other speakers: Maggie Cao (Columbia University), Andrianna Campbell (CUNY), Amanda Douberley (School of the Art Institute of Chicago), Jason E. Hill (New-York Historical Society), Liz Kim (The Courtauld Institute of Art), Lauren Kroiz (University of California......

Ticket/entry details: to be advised

Organised by: Hélène Valance (Terra Foundation for American Art Postdoctoral Fellow, The Courtauld Institute of Art) and Alex J. Taylor (Terra Foundation Research Fellow in American Art, Tate)


Destruction has long occupied a central position in the construction of an American national image. From Cotton Mather’s description of Boston as ‘the City of Destruction’ to the 9/11 attacks and Hurricane Katrina, the sheer visual force of destruction has repeatedly left an indelible mark on the collective psyche. As historians such as Richard Slotkin and Kevin Rozario have demonstrated, violent and destructive episodes have been inextricably linked with the apparently opposing forces of creation and regeneration so central to American self-imaging. This symposium will elaborate on such historical accounts to examine....read more



Research seminar: Contemporaneity in South Asian Art

The Progressives and The Expat Experience (title tbc)

Monday, 8 June 2015

18.00, Research Forum Seminar Room

Speaker(s): Krishan Khanna (artist)

Ticket/entry details: to be advised

Organised by: Zehra Jumabhoy with Professor Deborah Swallow (The Courtauld Institute of Art, London)

Further details to follow.....



Research seminar: Art & Vision Science

The Sackler Centre Seminar Series: 3

Helmholtz, Gombrich, and the Beholder’s Share

Tuesday, 9 June 2015

18.00, Research Forum Seminar Room

blue and pink arrows depict flow of information into and out of brain in a woman’s head

Speaker(s): Professor Anil Seth (Co-Director of the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, University of Sussex)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission with advance booking required: Booking not yet open

Organised by: Tim Satterthwaite and Dr Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld Institute of Art).

Science and art have long realized that experience depends on the involvement of the experiencer. In art history this is Gombrich’s “beholder’s share”, and in science this traces to Helmholtz’s concept of perception as inference. The shared idea is that our perceptual experience – whether of the world, of ourselves, or of an artwork – depends on the active interpretation of sensory input.  Perception becomes a generative act, one in which biological and sociocultural influences conspire to shape the brain’s ‘best guess’ of the causes of its sensory signals. In the third of three seminars for 2014-15 led by the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science, Professor Anil Seth will trace the links between these ideas, calling informally on distinct.....read more



research seminar: history of photography

Polished Steel and Palpitating Flesh: Photography Between Image and Object

Wednesday, 10 June 2015

17.30, Research Forum Seminar Room

table with open books showing a diverse selection of photgraphs

Speaker(s): David Campany (artist, curator and lecturer; University of Westminster)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Yasmin Amaratunga and Professor Julian Stallabrass (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

"My photographs do not lend themselves to reproduction. The very qualities that give them life would be lost in reproduction. The quality of touch in its deepest living sense is inherent in my photographs. When that sense of touch is lost, the heartbeat of the photograph is extinct - dead. My interest is in the living. That is why I cannot give permission to reproduce my photographs." Who might have written these words? What kind of photographer may refuse reproduction on the basis that their images are un-reproducible objects? David Campany considers this and other examples from the long-standing tension between the photograph as.....read more



research seminar: Modern and Contemporary

Affective Violence. Wladyslaw Strzeminski's To my Friends the Jews

Monday, 15 June 2015

18.00, Research Forum Seminar Room

Speaker(s): Luiza Nader (Institute of Art History, University of Warsaw)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Maria Mileeva

Wladyslaw Strzeminski’s is perceived as being one of the most prominent Polish avantgarde artists producing art in the spirit of great belief in the powers of Reason. His extraoridinary work To my Friends the Jews was created just after the end of the World War II. It consists of ten collages, neither signed nor dated. Strzeminski combined drawings, photographs (from the ghetto and the death camps) and expressive descriptions. All the representations the artist involved could be perceived as fragments or remnants of the lost archive.....read more



Sacred Traditions and the Arts seminar

God or Not? Francis Bacon, Paul Nash and David Jones

Tuesday, 16 June 2015

18.00, Research Forum Seminar Room

photo of Francis Bacon looking down a shaft or stairwell

Speaker(s): Dr Rina Arya (Reader in Visual Communication, University of Wolverhampton) and Professor Paul Hills (Professor Emeritus, The Courtauld Institute of Art)

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Professor Ben Quash (King’s College London) and Dr Scott Nethersole (The Courtauld Institute of Art)

This seminar will explore from two perspectives how 20th-century art has responded to the felt godlessness of that century - or else has questioned it.  Francis Bacon was a resolute atheist who opposed religious readings of his work, and this also explained the critical (in both senses of the word) neglect of discussion of the religious significance of his work. His repeated use of religious symbols throughout his oeuvre, however, cannot be ignored. Our first talk will argue that Bacon was a militant atheist who used his art, and in particular religious images, to react against a tradition.....read more



Research seminar: Renaissance

On Michelangelo as a Sculptor, Pupil of Benedetto da Maiano

Wednesday, 17 June 2015

17.30, Research Forum Seminar Room

Speaker(s): Professor Francesco Caglioti (Universita’ di Napoli)

Respondent: Caroline Elam

Ticket/entry details: Open to all, free admission

Organised by: Dr Guido Rebecchini

According to the earliest and most authoritative biographers of Michelangelo (Giorgio Vasari and Ascanio Condivi), he was formed as a sculptor entirely within Lorenzo the Magnificent’s sculpture garden near San Marco in Florence. There, like nowhere else, the young and promising artist would have been stimulated and fulfilled, both socially and intellectually.  All the same, the coterie he encountered in the garden was inadequate to the task of training him in the technical mastery necessary to realise his early masterpieces. Notwithstanding such a contradiction, modern scholars have hardly explored the early training.....read more



Piero della Francesca and disegno

Conference


Friday, 19 June and Saturday, 20 June 2015

timings to be confirmed, Kenneth Clark Lecture Theatre, The Courtauld Institute of Art and Sainsbury Wing Theatre, National Gallery, London.


Christ standing in a river as John the Baptist baptises himPiero della Francesca, The Baptism of Christ, c. 1440. (Courtesy of the National Gallery, London)

Keynote Speaker: Professor Emeritus James R. Banker (North Caroline State University)

Confirmed Speakers: Carmen Bambach (The Metropolitan Museum of Art), Roberto Bellucci (Opificio delle Pietre Dure), Ciro Castelli (Opificio delle Pietre Dure), Frank Dabell (Temple University, Rome), Francesco P. Di Teodoro (Politecnico di Torino and Centro Linceo Interdisciplinare “B. Segre”, Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei), David Franklin (Archive of Modern Conflict, Toronto and London), Cecilia Frosinini (Opificio delle Pietre Dure), Giacomo Guazzini (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa), Amanda Lillie (University of York), Rocco Sinisgalli (University of Rome, La Sapienza), Elena Squillantini (Fondazione di Studi di Storia dell'Arte Roberto Longhi)

Ticket/entry details: £26 (£16 students, Courtauld staff/students and concessions) BOOKING NOW OPEN!

Organised by: Professor Emeritus James R. Banker (North Caroline State University), Professor Tom Henry (University of Kent), Dr Machtelt Brüggen Israëls (University of Amsterdam), Dr Scott Nethersole (The Courtauld), Dr Nathaniel Silver (Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum), and Dr Caroline Campbell (National Gallery, London)

The role of design (disegno) is fundamental to understanding the working practice of Piero della Francesca. While none of his works on paper survive, research conducted in the past decade by the Opificio delle Pietre Dure and the Sherman Fairchild Paintings Conservation Center at the Metropolitan Museum of Art has revealed Piero’s obsessive working and reworking......read more



Continuous Page. Scrolls and Scrolling from Papyrus to Hypertext

Project

CALL FOR PROJECT PARTICIPANTS

Deadline: 17 April 2015

Workshops 22 - 23 June 2015 and 21 - 22 September 2015

The Courtauld Institute of Art, London

Scrolls encompass in one sweep the oldest and the most contemporary ideas about images and image-making. On the one hand, some of the most enduring artefacts of the ancient world adopt the scroll form, evoking long-standing associations with the Classical tradition, Eastern and Middle Eastern cultures, theatrical oration, and the word of the law. Yet today, scrolling is also the single most common interaction between people and their digital media: fingers routinely swipe across trackpads and touch-screens through reams of infinite hypertext. In between these two extremes too, we find a plethora of different artists and craftsmen turning and returning to the medium, from medieval medical treatises and Japanese emakimono to 19th-century wallpaper or Jack Kerouac’s continuously-typewritten draft of On The Road. Participants are sought to take part in a collaborative.....read more




more to follow.....





Future conferences



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About this page

 

Please note that some dates and times may change, and further details and programmes will be added throughout the year, so please ensure that you bookmark this page, which will be updated on a regular basis. If you have any queries about attending an event please do not hesitate to contact us by telephone: 020 7848 2909/2785 or by email: researchforum@courtauld.ac.uk